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    Refresh me, what does F5 do again?

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      Refresh me

      Oh, you…

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        They make load balancing appliances and software favored by, among many others, large companies.

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          One of their ex-workers described its features in HN submission. Does everything enterprises might need for this kind of thing in one, integrated solution. It’s also a big, decades-old, publicly-traded company. Enterprise buyers like such attributes.

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            I see what you did there 😉

            Fun fact: They’re actually named after the fastest category of tornado on the Fujita scale.

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            Bye bye Nginx. It was a great run.

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              People who immediately say that they’re going to switch to Apache. How exactly do you expect OSS to be developed and paid for? Would you really be much happier if it was part-time volunteers instead of a paid dev team who are the shareholders of their success?

              Nginx is all BSD licensed, anyone can fork it at any time, if need be. Yet so far, it’s still maintained by nginx.com, even though there was already a fuss once the Inc got formed and funded a number of years ago.

              P.S. Out of curiosity, how’s the switchover from GitHub to GitLab going, past the Microsoft acquisition?

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                I do agree that switching just because of such move is not feasible.

                However, not all Nginx is OSS AFAIK, all Nginx plus features are closed source. I think.

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                  However, not all Nginx is OSS AFAIK, all Nginx plus features are closed source. I think.

                  Yes, and NGINX Plus is not available for a download unless you’re a paying or an evaluating customer, so, what difference does it make?

                  OSS NGINX is a great product by itself, unless you need some of the enterprise-level features, which are often not available in the lightweight alternatives anyways, so, it’s really kind of pointless to be speaking about switching just because the authors got a bit of cash for their hard work.

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                    I agree. I also don’t believe that it’ll make things “worse”, maybe it’ll make things even better with a company at the size of f5 supporting the OSS efforts as well.

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                    And Apache is not a viable choice after Nginx.

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                      I’m curious as to your reasons why not? Doesn’t Apache httpd have event and worker modules that preform as well as nginx? Do you have reasons other than performance?

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                        My concern is ease of configuration. I mostly understand the parts of Nginx config I use, I never really understood the Apache config.

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                          I have a long history with both, so I feel qualified to answer this. Apache is larger, slower, and is more cumbersome to configure. But it is well tested, packed with features, and is the de facto reference implementation for anything to do with HTTP.

                          Nginx has a smaller footprint, is fast, easier to configure, and scales much better.

                          I have heard the difference between the two reduced to this sound bite: Apache is an HTTP server, Nginx is a web server.

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                            That sound bite doesn’t make any sense for multiple reasons, one being that Nginx can actually reverse proxy / load balance other protocols than HTTP…

                            edit: Apache is nearly the same performance today, and Apache has actual features like Cache Invalidation which Nginx doesn’t offer in the open source codebase… which makes object caching useless.

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                      P.S. Out of curiosity, how’s the switchover from GitHub to GitLab going, past the Microsoft acquisition?

                      It’s going great, thanks for asking.

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                        P.S. Out of curiosity, how’s the switchover from GitHub to GitLab going, past the Microsoft acquisition?

                        All came back to GitHub when they enabled free private repositories.

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                        This is precisely the same super flawed logic people used when Redhat bought IBM, Microsoft bought Github. Lather, rinse, repeat.

                        Open source is big business now. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing (though I’ll admit it can be).

                        We have to wait and see how F5 handles their new acquisition..

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                        Press releases and incredible journeys do better over at the orange site.

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                          Not everybody reads the “orange site”. If we look at the Lobsters description, we read:

                          Lobsters is a computing-focused community centered around link aggregation and discussion, […]

                          Which this news correctly matches. I admire your will to make this community better, but on the other hand, it’s not clear to me what should or shouldn’t be posted.

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                            I am in favor of adopting a policy that explicitly excludes any discussion whatsoever of mergers and acquisitions.

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                              Yeah I don’t read it for a reason.

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                              Your positive contributions to this site (for me your recent blogpost about burnout in particular) are tarnished by persistent content-policing and dismissive remarks about the submission’s content. Even if you’re technically right with the former based on the self-description of this site or some previous discussion thread, both the mods and the majority of the community usually disagree with you (judging by votes and the moderation log).

                              If you really don’t want to see this content here, start a meta thread so we can make a new decision. But comments like this achieve nothing and come across as arrogantly assuming authority you don’t have, so please just knock it off.

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                                I respectfully disagree–and while the meta thread has been a while in coming out of deference for our mods time we’ve held off.

                                In the meantime, comments like mine are useful for providing public reasoning and feedback on site culture. Otherwise, you end up with a hivemind with norms where people go “Huh, wait, how did we get here?” instead of being able to point at specific trends and examples.

                                I’m assuming no authority beyond that which a normal user has, and while there are a lot of people who take exception with anybody telling people not to piss in the pool few of them seem to be running around with mops.

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                                  Otherwise, you end up with a hivemind with norms where people go “Huh, wait, how did we get here?” instead of being able to point at specific trends and examples.

                                  The hivemind I am afraid of is one where content guidelines are so narrow it becomes hard to contribute anything genuinely new. Anyway I don’t think you will achieve your goal with your comments.

                                  while there are a lot of people who take exception with anybody telling people not to piss in the pool few of them seem to be running around with mops

                                  That you thought this is an appropriate metaphor for somebody trying to contribute to lobste.rs is exactly what I meant with “dismissive remarks”, also this:

                                  [These posts] do better over at the orange site

                                  @cnst is a longer-standing member and therefore not a good example to make my point, but consider that this choice of words drives away people from contributing to this community. Even if you then think that maybe we’re better off with “those people” not contributing, surely you couldn’t assume that their submissions are intrinsically worthless just because they posted something off-topic at some point.

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                                    I don’t have a problem with the people–it’s the submissions that are the issue.

                                    There may be a miscommunication here; if so, this series of posts I made a few years ago gives my reasoning and concerns in much better detail than I can give here. If you still disagree after reading, that’s fine, but it should help us have a better discussion.

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                                That’s why the link is for the mailing list that only has a couple of paragraphs.

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                                NGINX Has been running a pretty elaborate ad campaign on why to switch away from F5’s products to NGINX. I guess F5 really nipped that problem in the bud 🙂

                                I’ll say what I always say in these kinds of acquisitions: F5 has very little incentive to hamstring the product if the customers are already happy with it. Just look at the Microsoft acquisition of {GitHub,LinkedIn}.

                                Bias disclosure: I’ve received an offer letter from F5 and am planning on accepting the position.

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                                  Just look at the Microsoft acquisition of {GitHub,LinkedIn}.

                                  Alternatively, you could look at the Oracle acquisition of Sun.

                                  They also may not hamstring it on purpose, but turn it into an inferior product due to incompetence/underfunding/scaring away talent (Microsoft acquisition of Skype, News Corp acquisition of myspace, Microsoft acquisition of Nokia, Google acquisition of Motorola mobile, Intel acquisition of McAfee, and the list goes on and on)

                                  Just because one company (Microsoft) is not currently hamstringing something they recently require doesn’t mean they won’t later on nor that other companies will magically adopt a strategy of ‘leaving it alone for now’.

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                                    Fair enough. I suppose the most we can conclude at this juncture is it could easily go either way. Hopefully F5 will do what’s right.

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                                  A friend of mine works over at F5 and claims they’re just gonna rebrand his current project “the new nginx”. Heh. Maybe they’ll just funnel money at current nginx devs and not mess with anything?