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    This is a very cool article, thanks for writing it.

    What I find cool about it is that most setups I’ve seen using either DAT or IPFS usually rely on P2P protocols as an afterthought. The sites are usually hosted in a standard HTTP webserver while also being shared and pinned in P2P networks. I love that the setup described there eliminates the need to maintain a web server without necessarily introducing vendor lock-in. If the author wanted they could migrate to a self-hosted or third-party IPFS gateway and pinning service. The more we explore alternative decentralized protocols for real day-to-day usage like blogging, the better those platforms become. I’m excited to try a similar setup in the future.

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      Wow. I honestly hadn’t thought about it like that. The big motivator for me was the fact that sourcehut doesn’t have static website hosting so I needed a way to bypass running my own server. I just took it as an opportunity to try something new.

      Also it’s worth mentioning most of the work is done by ipfs-deploy. If not for a “zero config” tool I might’ve not taken the afternoon to set up this deployment strategy and gone with an alternative.

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        I recently tried the major new 1.0beta1 release of Beaker Browser of Dat (now Hypercore) network, and was super impressed by its user friendliness. I mean, in an early-internet/geocities style, to be clear. It lets me start writing my own html immediately in the browser and serve it. I have a Raspberry Pi and I definitively plan to use it as my own “pinning” device soon, though there’s also a public website called hashbase that lets you pin up to 100 MB for free. Though there’s no Cloudflare-level public gateway for it as of now; that was certainly a strike of luck for IPFS. Personally I keep fingers crossed for all of IPFS, Hypercore/Dat, as well as Secure Scuttlebutt. I’d love to finally bootstrap a blog and have it shared on all 3 of those platforms xD plus ye olde http as well :)

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          Regarding SSB, you might like https://github.com/noffle/ssb-webify

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        On the point about org-mode, would using the Org export framework fit into your workflow? Some time ago I developed the ox-haunt package for exporting articles to the Haunt metadata + markdown format.

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          That absolutely looks like something I can use.

          I was just going to write the org files and export them to markdown with pandoc. I’ll look more into that package after work.

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          This is incredible! I’ve been wanting to figure out how to use IPFS to reliably host a static website accessible from the normal web. While this might not be as production ready as AWS or digital ocean CDN, it looks perfect for a personal website/blog.

          I’m also impressed by SXML! I might have to use haunt for static site generation!

          I doubt I’ll be using guix, though, since I’m on macOS. I do wish there were a similar package manager for macOS, but I suppose homebrew is usually sufficient to get the job done.

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            The Nix package manager totally works on macOS.

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              Ahh, nice, I didn’t know that. Might have to give it a shot.

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              Nix is a similar package manager that can be used with macOS but I’m not sure if haunt is in nixpkgs.

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              Just for fun? Or for some benefit?

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                Both. A personal website has been on my todo list for years and since I’m learning guile it felt like a good side project. I chose to deploy using IPFS because –as explained in the first paragraph– it’s shiny and I did not want to manage a server.

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                  Unless I’m missing something, I didn’t connect to your site via IPFS, so isn’t there some (HTTP) server you’re running? Also, managing a HTTP server is pretty trivial if you’re already hosting static content.

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                    Cloudflare IPFS gateway as noted in the article:

                    https://cloudflare-ipfs.com

                    IPFS here is a replacement for Git{Hub|Lab} pages. Author does not want to run a webserver.

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                      Well you are missing something: the part of the article where I talk about using cloudflare-ipfs to access my content through http.

                      And with regards to managing an http server I’d rather someone else do it. Between cloudflare and pinata I doubt I’ll ever have to troubleshoot downtime unless I let my domain name expire.

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                        Oops, I misunderstood that point. nvm then.