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    Also, I plan on publishing frequent, short blog posts where I will talk more about learning clojure itself, this is just something like introduction where I’m just interested in your opinion about how would you approach this.

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      I fondly look back on the time I wrote a small clojure script project about 6 years ago I believe. I don’t know if mom was a thing back then but certainly cljs did offer a lot of infrastructure for programming that I was used to.

      Three was an active eco system of libraries to choose from.

      I looked at cljs two years ago. The eco system felt atrophied. I was constantly researching what library was maintained and mature.

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        I looked at cljs two years ago. The eco system felt atrophied. I was constantly researching what library was maintained and mature.

        Is that because your perception is based on some other ecosystem where high commit churn and lots of new features signify progress?

        Because if you use this metric, then sure, you can get that impression.

        But if you need the libraries to get the job done, ClojureScript is pretty stable and useful.

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        We built 2 cljs SPA’s at my now-former employer, using the Om framework. It was a lovely stack to work in; the tooling (figwheel, cider nrepl) enabled you to live-reload code without needing to refresh the browser, and you could inspect the app-state atom in emacs without ever making any ajax calls.

        Also, with cljs (and something like om) your templating language is also cljs, so you aren’t stuck with some mixture of html and embedded js. It’s really a delightful environment to develop in, and I would certainly reach for it again were I doing frontend/SPA work.

        I’m sure there are newer frameworks now, but we modeled our basic application structure after this: https://github.com/circleci/frontend