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What are you doing this week? Feel free to share!

Keep in mind it’s OK to do nothing at all, too.

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    Working on a new release of our “Computational Law” tool (UI + Interpreter). Should be open sourced quite soon.

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      That’s really interesting! What will it do?

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        You can take any legal text (insurance policy for now) and model it as a computable data structure. Our interpreter is then able to answer questions on your model. We use a form of logic programming.

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          Is it limited to predefined clauses? Or predefined questions?

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            What we do is:

            1. you take the legal text in question and you create a model
            2. that model will define a mathematical search space
            3. the interpreter will return a list of question in order to solve a query, typically in the insurance domain you want to know if you are covered and up to which amount.

            So questions are not predefined but “found” in the model.

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              That’s really exciting, please let me know when you make it public. I would love to test it!

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                I will! I will surely post it here!

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      Getting the immigration paperwork so I can start at my new job!

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        Congrats with your new job and good luck with the move!

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        Personal:

        • Researching Elo systems
        • Checking out Zig now that I’ve found a more approachable learning resource (https://ziglearn.org)
        • Having another go at coding a chess AI (last time I got as far as alpha–beta pruning). This time I’d like to integrate it as a lichess bot (https://lichess.org/player/bots)

        Work:

        • More Vue.js (i18n, tests)
        • Maybe writing something new for our engineering blog
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          Sounds like fun - are there any specific resources you’ve used on writing chess bots? I play but have never looked ‘under the hood’ of things like Stockfish.

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            https://www.chessprogramming.org is probably the best resource I’ve used. It covers the general topics and the history, and links to papers too.

            Otherwise, reading the codebase of bots e.g. https://github.com/thomasahle/sunfish

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            I would also suggest you to check the following resources to learn Zig:

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              Thanks for these!

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            Read “Rhythm of War” (last book took me a week to finish, reading about 12+ hours avg per day). But I was making notes too and read slower than usual. This time, I’ll probably read a bit faster and skim read the mental health portrayal sections (they are well done and realistic based on reviews, but they are becoming too dark to read when I’m mostly looking for an entertaining read).

            Work wise, if I’m able to take a break from RoW, I want to get started on Python projects tutorial/book. And there’s plenty of blog posts pending on my todo list. I even got an invitation to post for another site, I’m quite nervous about it.

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              I am so pumped for this book. I just read Dawnshard when it was widely released last week.

              I read ebooks exclusively. When I read Sanderson’s books I have a highlighting system in Apple Books so that I can keep track of moments/explanations/prose that I really like.

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                +1 for RoW! Finished reading all the cosmere novellas last week. The only series I have yet to touch is Mistborn—and I plan to start that after RoW.

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                  +1 I waited until today for the audiobook release and I’m so excited to start listening!

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                  (Looking for) Work:

                  • Rewriting my cover letter to make it more catchy, buzz keyword friendly, after I get my first set of negative responses to my job applications. I salute the companies that take the time to send you a negative answer (even an automatic answer). It is not funny to get one but at least you have answer.
                  • Sending a new batch of applications after that.

                  Personal:

                  • Research hammond-ish organs and tonewheel-clone like GSI Gemini and the technology behind the hardware and software instruments;
                  • Brewing some nice coffee beans from La boutique Del Caffè
                  • Reading “I am a Strange Loop” by Douglas Hofstadter;
                  • Looking for a digital piano.
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                    Work:
                    I’m troubleshooting an issue with a poorly written Excel add-in and the usual application support.

                    Personal:
                    I’m porting an old experimental transport protocol to macOS. The code originally ran on a Sun-3 so there are plenty of endianness and integer size issues.

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                      I’m trying out a Kinesis keyboard. So far I’m having a difficult time, but it’s only been here a few hours. The letter and number keys are easy enough (except a couple problem letters like ‘c’ and ‘b’), but the modifiers and punctuation keys have been very frustrating. I use Emacs, and Emacs bindings in my shell, and I think that’s making it even worse. It’s much easier to use the arrow keys and home/end, but I still reach for the control key.

                      Other than that…

                      @work I’m working on a change to one of our Jenkins pipelines.

                      @home I’m going to practice typing, try to find good keybindings for emacs, and I want to read more.

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                        Kubecon!

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                          Exploring nodeJS as I write a small service at work. Nice to be able to do some programming again and this node stuff is fairly interesting.

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                            I wanted to build a Rust extension for Python with PyO3, but that got me interested in how C extensions actually work. That got me interested in how the interpreter itself works, so now I’ve started diving into how the C of CPython works. Once I build a mental model I’ll start writing a deep dive on how it works by focusing on one particular class e.g. list.

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                              • Learning more than I thought I’d need to about WebRTC and related technologies.
                              • Picking up my stalled attempt at migrating the HomeLab to a more automated orchestration & service mesh setup
                              • Getting outside dodging the rain, either walking or cycling