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    OK. Fork it. Build your own community/dev processes/culture around the way you feel is best, and let the market decide. Don’t do the public talk circuit and whinge about how Linus is a meanie.

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      OK. Fork it. Build your own community/dev processes/culture around the way you feel is best, and let the market decide. Don’t do the public talk circuit and whinge about how Linus is a meanie.

      I find this kind of response to criticism, to be generally counter productive. It is often simply being dismissive. I mean.. shouldn’t forking an entire community be the /last/ option, not the /first/ one?

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        Build your own community/dev processes/culture around the way you feel is best, and let the market decide.

        I won’t repeat trousers’ comment that forking is the last resort (which I agree on).

        I will add that a community where someone can talk about problems openly is a healthy robust community.

        Don’t do the public talk circuit

        This talk was at linux.conf.au, which is a significant community open source conference. A bunch of kernel developers & maintainers come every year. Linus himself has come a few times. Standing up in front of your peers (or former peers) to explain problems you see is not “doing the public talk circuit”.

        Linus is a meanie

        One point made in the talk is how the “angry Linus” meme (particularly the way his abusive LKML outbursts are covered so widely) is a barrier to talking constructively about disfunction in the rest of the kernel developer/maintainership (which is what the majority of the talk was about).