1. 24
  1.  

  2. 7

    This is a thought I’ve been having for a year or so, that email really is the original social media. There’s still a lot of room at the bottom to personalize IMAP. GMail kind of took over that space, took it to a certain level, and then stopped. It seems like no one else is going to bother continuing. It is on my too long list of things to do.

    1. 9

      It seems like no one else is going to bother continuing.

      Because Google is going to kill any interesting extension to IMAP by not supporting it for @gmail.com. Because Google along with other big players is now clenched in a delusional “war” to lock down users in their own messaging walled gardens, and none of them is interested in supporting anything open at the moment. Fortunately they can’t outright kill email because its user base is bigger than all the rest of messaging combined. It’s the only communication method that actually works for everyone on the Internet.

      This is, by the way, why XMPP died. I used to be able to talk to @gmail.com addresses over it but then Google simply killed federation citing some mumbly non-reason.

      1. 2

        BTW, XMPP federation with Google still works (if the Google user is using Google Talk – which mostly you access with third party clients these days, since they no longer maintain any of the official ones). Several of my many XMPP contacts are @gmail.com addresses and I talk to them this way every day.

        1. 2

          You’re the lucky one then :-) All of my contacts have dispersed over facebooks/twitters/imessages.

      2. 7

        I recently discovered delta.chat as a fun alternative IMAP UX for chats

        1. 1

          I remember several years ago someone launched a similar chat interface. I can’t remember what it was called though. But this is definitely interesting.

          1. 1

            delta.chat

            That’s pretty brilliant. A combo of that, end-to-end crypto, and Keybase.io-style discovery could be interesting. I’d say chat messages should probably be in their own folder(s) to avoid cluttering up the main inbox, though.

            1. 2

              By default delta.chat stores chats in a Chat folder and uses OpenPGP when it can detect support using Autoencrypt

        2. 5

          A decent read, and I learned more about DNS. That fact that I actually prefer email for communication with my friends helps me appreciate the content, although most of them don’t use it much. (Hrm, maybe that says more about me than my friends…)

          But given how complicated it is to setup what is mentioned in the article, I don’t hold out a lot of hope that this will become the norm.

          1. 5

            No, it’s not you. Email has fallen out of favor because it has not advanced beyond Gmail. I think spam is mostly to blame. You should have at least one whole domain to invent new addresses from. This would allow “you” (and really I mean with software assistance) to manage burner addresses and addresses for specific purposes.

            1. 4

              That’s exactly what I’ve been doing extremely happily for the last ~15 years. A completely separate domain with a few category-styled mail aliases to one mailbox which all accept + suffixes on the local part, which I fill in with the domain name of the service I’m giving the address to. Great indeed to manage burners and specific purposes, but also lets you watch who sells or otherwise lets slip your email address, vs. who doesn’t.

          2. 5

            While email is good, there is also a place for federated instant messaging. So in addition to running smtp on your domain, run a matrix home server.

            1. 4

              The easiest way to self-host a mail server is probably Mail-in-a-Box, but easy is a relative term. Because of spammers activities over the years email servers are distrustful of new senders. It can be easier to pay a company to handle the complexity for you, companies such as FastMail, KolabNow, Posteo or many others.

              It’s probably best not to host your own mail server, unless you want all your outgoing e-mail to go straight to spam. I wrote about this a while back:

              http://penguindreams.org/blog/how-google-and-microsoft-made-email-unreliable/

              And going a bit further, your domain can be taken from you. We live in an era where the very few control access, and can revoke your ability to produce content simply because they don’t like your opinions:

              http://fightthefuture.org/article/the-new-era-of-corporate-censorship/

              1. 1

                I have contemplated using my own domain for email for years now, but haven’t done it (yet?), because I already have multiple emails to keep track of and the immediate benefits of having control don’t outweigh adding another one to that list just yet. (The yahoo breach got so very close, but procrastination got the better of me :/ )