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    Reposting my HN comment:

    “Do Emacs and Vim users have some other characteristic that makes them more likely to succeed during interviews? Perhaps they tend to be more willing to invest time and effort customizing a complex editor in the short-term in order to get returns from a more powerful tool in the long-term?”

    One thing I noticed on Lobste.rs is that a lot of them like the old school editors. That’s normal. What was more interesting was that they were constantly sharing and discussing their customizations that made them more productive. Kept making me want to have another go at those editors. I didn’t since I came from Windows with big, full-featured editors that could do everything (or Notepad++ or Notepad). Still, I keep reading those comments since there’s always new and interesting things people are coming up with.

    In other words, I think the author is onto something worth further investigation and comparisons. Especially comparing VS Code programming to experienced folks using highly-customized, full-featured setups in the other stuff. I bet the results would be more interesting than a random person tried using Emacs or whatever.

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      What was more interesting was that they were constantly sharing and discussing their customizations that made them more productive.

      I think your takeaway is a bit off here. A vim/emacs with enough plugins to compete with Eclipse (or vscode) isn’t what anyone wants. My go to, vanilla vim is very capable in it’s own right. It’s more an excercise in learning what’s already there. Example, all the vim “tab” plugins vs :bn :bp.

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        It would be interesting to take account of VSCode extensions.

        If I were picking an editor for an interview, it’d probably be VSCode with the vim extension, which gives you the niceties of modal editing and the niceties of a (partially) integrated dev env.