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    Nice, but can it run fvwm95? I kid, and am glad that this wm is continuing to see development. What I would be interested in learning about is what the roadmap is for FVWM3.

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      I so very much love to see roff as the second language in a code base. And 5% of it at that.

      Yes please.

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        Dang. No official FVWM3 releases yet, and nary a screenshot to be found. I’d be curious to try FVWM3 when it’s packaged for Fedora, not sure I have the patience these days for compiling my own desktop / window manager.

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          Little off topic but can anyone point me to the best guide/howto for configuring FVWM (2) to ones needs? … or its just official documentation that all is needed?

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            The official documentation is all that’s needed, although since it’s a reference it’s hard to get started. Most people get started by looking at themes other people have written to get a feel for what’s possible and borrowing elements they like. The old fvwm website used to have a screenshot gallery where people would submit screenshots and their underlying config, although it looks like most of the links are dead now. You might want to look at http://fvwm-themes.sourceforge.net/ to see what they have.

            Fwiw, here’s my screenshot and config. Note before trying to use it that it depends on $XTERM being defined to your preferred terminal and is expecting a file in /usr/local/etc/apps.fvwm2rc to define which apps to populate into the Programs part of the start menu. My $XTERM is rxvt -bg black -fg GhostWhite -fn 6x13 -geometry 100x36 -sb -sl 1000, and the config shows how to use AddToMenu with Popup and Exec so writing an apps.fvwm2rc should be simple enough.

            (The good thing about the fvwm community is people trading configs. The bad part is these days we’re all dinosaurs.)

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              Thank You for you detailed reply, that will get me started if I will find time to start FVWM learning process :)

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            “FvwmPrompt – a new module written in golang.

            That’s a radical change in direction, and an unfortunate one, considering they’re deprecating the c code this replaces.

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              I think you’re reading too much into a very small change. The Developers doc doesn’t even mention golang:

              Programming Languages

              The following programming languages are allowed:

              • ANSI C
              • Perl
              • Portable /bin/sh scripts for examples.
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                They sey

                ./configure --enable-golang needed at compile time

                So it’s not only is the module not compiled in by default, the support for go is off by default. I agree with the sibling; I wouldn’t read too much into this.

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                  Their plan is still to remove the c tool this replaces.

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                    I’m not intimately familiar with FVWM (I might have used 2, I’m not sure) but are Modules considered to be part of the core window manager? Or are they “nice to have” add-ons?

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                      These are modules that are built with fvwm. If this was e.g. a separate repository, there’d be no concern.

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                        Weirdly, I can’t find the source of FVWMPrompt in this directory

                        https://github.com/fvwmorg/fvwm3/tree/master/modules/FvwmConsole

                        Also this entry made me smile

                        Changes - Renamed fvwm2 to fvwm almost everywhere (except file names). - 21 years ago

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                          21 years ago

                          Nice find.

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                  Interesting take on something which is currently opt-in.

                  No I am not deprecating C modules at all. What I am doing though is making it easier for modules to be written in any language without specific language bindings to a really bad API as we have now in the form of perllib in Fvwm.

                  With FvwmMFL, this module spits out JSON down a socket to whichever module written in any language is listening on. Since it’s just data, you can use any language as long as it understands talking to unix domain sockets. This is what FvwmPrompt (written in Go) is illustrating.

                  I do plan on increasing the amount of modules which are written in Go, in to Fvwm3, hence why I started with FvwmPrompt – but that’s just a preference, and is in no way indicative of any sort of C deprecation.

                  Be careful, ethoh, in your thinking next time.

                  – Thomas

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                    I do plan on increasing the amount of modules which are written in Go, in to Fvwm3, hence why I started with FvwmPrompt – but that’s just a preference, and is in no way indicative of any sort of C deprecation.

                    What I said is that the module it replaces (which was written in C) is deprecated, which is accurate.

                    Be careful, ethoh, in your thinking next time.

                    My thinking was right, and your post does pretty much confirm what I already knew.

                    If you think otherwise, feel free to reply and explain how my thinking was not right and/or elaborate on why you believe that I should be more careful in my thinking next time.

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                      Ah, right. I suppose you can view it like that. Yes, if you use --enabke-golang then this won’t build FvwmConsole so it is a replacement. That said, if you do nothing, then FvwmConsole still exists and can be used. I suppose the point I’m trying to make is that FvwmConsole isn’t going to be receiving any more love and attention, but I do plan on evolving FvwmPrompt in to something more, hence why I see it as a worthy successor, even now.

                      As for separate repositories – it’s an interesting one. I could do this, and FvwmPrompt did start off like that in its own repository, but it does make users’ and package maintainers’ lives harder, as the functionality is then spread out all over the place.

                      – Thomas