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    The right to be able to transfer your data from system to system is part of the new General Data Protection Regulation of the European Union.Apart from the above article on the GDPR (quoted below), see also the specific Wikipedia article on data portability in the GDPR. Not sure whether this also guarantees right to import your data in the other provider, though!

    A person is to be able to transfer personal data from one electronic processing system to and into another, without being prevented from doing so by the data controller. Data that has been sufficiently anonymised is excluded, but data that has been only de-identified but remains possible to link to the individual in question, such as by providing the relevant identifier, is not.[25] Both data being ‘provided’ by the data subject and data being ‘observed’, such as about behaviour, are included. In addition, the data must be provided by the controller in a structured and commonly used a standard electronic format. The right to data portability is provided by Article 20 of the GDPR.[6] Legal experts see in the final version of this measure a “new right” created that “reaches beyond the scope of data portability between two controllers as stipulated in [Article 20]”.[26]

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      Hmm, I wonder what happens if your data is inseparably mixed with other people’s private data.

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        Fortunately, there are already market incentives to allow importing data :)

        Will the GDPR force FB to allow users to take their social graphs with them?

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        So, silly question, what happens when you are on a site that awards reviews 1-5 stars and you move to a site that’s 1-4 stars?

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          I think this is a very minor issue. If the lawmakers were to step-in, they could easily force a standard for ratings that would make them transferable. Actually, you don’t even need to transfer anything, it would be enough even if you could just link your profiles across platforms, so a customer could be burdened to judge what it means to be rated 3.7/4 on Uber while 3.12/3.1415 on Lyft.

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            If the lawmakers were to step-in, they could easily force a standard for ratings

            It would be crazy to expect lawmakers to do anything sensible here. Ignoring the moral issues with forcing companies to adopt particular algorithms, it also doesn’t make practical sense if you want your software to work correctly. Ratings also aren’t a solved problem.

            The real solution here is technical/UX; we have the technology for distributed, trustless rating systems. They’re just really inconvenient to use right now. Getting that to work is better for everyone than legislators forcing some particular ratings format.

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              Getting that to work is better for everyone than legislators forcing some particular ratings format.

              Well, you might need the legislators to force the current platforms to integrate with the trustless rating systems. On the other hand, you probably don’t need much support from the platform, all it takes could be the ability to include a secure hash in your profile on a given platform to link your account on an external system.

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            That’s easily addressed by the importing site writing a function to convert scores from 1 system to the other. I’ve done this before - it’s not hard at all.