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    Develop empathy practices letterstoanewdeveloper.com
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    what have the users ever done for us, huh?

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      This job would be great if it weren’t for the customers.

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        Yeah, it would be just so amazing if software could just buy itself and we could be rid of all those pesky users. There’s one of them asking for something new ever. Fscking. Day.

        And, I mean, it’s the entitlement that gets me, it’s as if we were writing software, like, for them.

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        They might not care how elegant the code is, but they might care whether it works. We took a year out to rewrite our live video streaming platform from the ground up. The result is a much improved less buggy experience for our users, and it does pay off in sales.

        An empathetic relationship to our users is key for us. We care deeply about whether what we implemented works. Every failed session matters deeply to our users, and we feel it too. It drives us on to figure out ways to make it even better.

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          I think the biggest problem is when people rewrite working code for no other apparent reason than “it’s not elegant” or something like that. There’s nothing wrong with rewriting code if you have a clear problem and decided that rewriting is the best solution, but if you rewrite “just because” … meh.

          I’ve sometimes called this evidence-based refactoring.

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            Totally agree, and also there’s sometimes a fear of rewriting.

            I think rewrites are dangerous if they invite spec creep. 2.0 syndrome of both rewriting and adding a bunch of new stuff.

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            They might not care how elegant the code is, but they might care whether it works.

            Indeed, I’d say that’s the only thing they care about.

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            They don’t care about elegance of code.

            They don’t care how much you love to develop.

            They don’t care if you are learning and growing.

            Then, perhaps, THEY should develop empathy.

            Empathy goes both ways. Telling another person to develop empathy is failing to empathise with that person.