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    Setting up PTR (or rDNS) record on AWS is only achievable via a request ticket and requires several exchanges. In comparison, on UpCloud (our current cloud provider) this could be done directly on the dashboard.

    A lot of people use EC2 VMs as “stable” servers, and it’s fine, but my theory is that they were not designed as such in the first place. I mean, it’s in the name: Elastic Compute Cloud. For an elastic server, rDNS is typically not a hard requirement, neither is a “clean” IP address. That may explain why there isn’t a simple and easy UI to change rDNS records.

    Did you consider hosting your own MTAs in a datacenter? It may be quite expensive (maybe around 1-2k€/mo in Paris for a half-rack and a /28 of addresses), but you can have your long-term IP addresses blocks and make sure your IPs are always clean.

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      1-2k per month is a bit too expensive for us at the moment but we might need that in the future, which data center do you recommend for this option?

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        I have experience with only one DC in Paris, which is “Zayo Poissonière”, located in the 2nd ward. The security is good, and the location is super convenient (which is important if you have employees based in Paris). I guess other datacenters located in the suburbs are more affordable, but much less convenient.

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          You can always buy this management service to a company.

          In a previous job, we used to have racks in 2 equinix datacenters in Paris, operated by another company. We had access to servers (even the management interface), but we had to go through tickets when asking for networking changes (because we were connected to their network infrastructure to avoid running ours), but also all physical maintenance like changing disks or racking new servers. They took care of our IPs too (we had a /26), so all BGP etc.

          I found that this solution was the perfect mix between not using a cloud provider, and still not running everything ourselves. If you want to go self hosted to that point, I think this is a really neat approach.

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            Agree, renting a bunch of servers can be a very nice solution. You get exactly the specs you want, you get real hardware (and you can get an actual physical private network for them), and you still never have to go to a datacenter.

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              Thanks for the advice!

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              Thanks, the location is perfect! Just bookmarked their website for future use.

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          I’m in the emailing business, too. We are hosting our own MTAs with our own IP address space totaling under 500 EUR a month on bare-metal in a data center in Frankfurt, Germany.

          But you can have it even cheaper: You can get a /24 for around 100 EURs a month, you can announce that address space using cloud hosters such as Vultr who are super fast, reliable and not really expensive. You can use all of thoses IPs on one VM or split them up like you want.

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            Sounds like a good option, thanks! Can I know where could I buy the /24 range?

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              There are a couple of options:

              • Become a LIR (RIPE NCC member) yourself and apply for the /24 waiting list.
              • There are a couple of LIRs offering IP space to lease. They usually sponsor an ASN for you as well.
              • Become a LIR, go on secondary markets for IP space. There are a few, current IPv4 prices are up to 30 USD per IP. Regular LIR fee still apply though.

              We also got spare IP space available. PM me if you’re interested in leasing.

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              AWS supports hosting your own IP range on EC2 now, as well: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ec2-byoip.html

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                Good point! However it’s not yet available in all regions without all netblock statuses either.

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                Out of curiosity, how many watts of power are you getting at 500eur/mo? My vague recollection from a few years ago was that colo providers would hand out rack units for negligible money but charge something like 100eur/mo per ~200W since every Joule the servers consume has to be paid for twice - once at the point of use, then again for the HVAC required to dump the heat. (But all the colo providers I worked with had racks and ranks going spare because servers are so power dense now that their AC and PSUs couldn’t keep up if all the space was filled with hot servers)

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                  My numbers are not really representative, but we pay around 30 EUR per 150 W ish. Luckily for us we are housed in a shared rack and heat was only once an issue where the data center provider was having an AC outage.

                  I agree, some DCs are housing some super old hardware which are dissipating a lot of power in form of heat so they didn’t only maxing out the available power, but were also forced to keep spare units.

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                    Thanks! I have a feeling my numbers might be really off, it’s been a while

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                  Question from someone who doesn’t know anything about MTAs: Why do you need so many IP addresses? Is it just that you need many servers to handle the amount of emails and thus 1 IP address per server, or is it something else that I am missing?

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                    It’s mostly the per IP reputation which can go southwards by the volume you are sending out.

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                      So you basically spread out the traffic over the IP addresses to keep your reputation stable. I’d love to know more about how that works. Do you rotate through the addresses? Have a container for every address?

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                  The Elastic IP reputation thing is an interesting problem when you think about it. How does one create a giant vending machine of compute resources and yet ensure that the IPs it offers don’t end up on any blacklists?

                  I may do some internal digging on this one. There may be an opportunity to better serve customers here.

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                    A SQLite database might just as well do the job.

                    Probably will need to scale to postgresql anyways.

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                      At a couple of terabytes, sure. SQLite goes a very, very long way.

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                      https://packet.com/ are excellent bare metal hosters with BGP support and cloud style provisioining so you get the best of both worlds. zero to tin in a couple of minutes and billing by the hour. I’ve also had good experience with netactuate.com who sometimes have older h/w servers available at lower rates but their provisioning isnt as slick as packet.

                      Also cool product idea good luck with the launch

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                        We forward our email out of AWS to a server on Linode. The server has a good reputation and is only 20$/month. We deliver over 250k emails a month this way and only had issues twice in around 7 years. Simple and much cheaper than third party email services.

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                          To me it looks like you’ve saved ~$8000 over 7 years.

                          Depending on your staffing costs, that could be worth the extra setup and two call-outs for debugging.

                          It wouldn’t be much of a saving if you were paying staff US rates to do it, though.