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    Dealing with interruptions is an interesting point about work, but finding work where just your output is judged and not the way that you do it is hard.

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      You’re right on the money! All things being equal, the result should be the only thing that matters.

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        Depends on the organization and who you’re working with. If you’re part of a team, your output is far from the only thing that matters.

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          Indeed! What I meant was, as long as you live up to everyones expectations, be it being part of a team and what comes with that territory, and/or delivering results, all things equal, it shouldn’t matter if you sit in a cubicle when you work, of if you’d rather stand on your hands and type with toes down the local park. It shouldn’t matter. But many places it does.

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            The one problem I see with remote working and/or exotic hours is pairing. (Assuming that is important to your team.) Remote pairing is possible, but I’d imagine a little less convenient than sitting next to each other. However, if your working hours doesn’t have reasonable overlap with the rest of the team efficient pairing would be impossible.

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      This is a healthy life change. Whether companies choose to accept it or not is a different story. I remember going through this when my oldest was born. I thought to myself, ‘What on earth have you been doing with all your free time… and now you have nothing to show for it?!’ I was forced to focus more, and became more productive with the time I did have available to get things done. Life is fun like that, and having children just helps to keep in perspective that what type of work you do is simply a means to an end.