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    Very cool! It would be nice if the example code changes with the selected language. Also navigating fonts should be easier. I’d like to use my arrow keys, but clicking would be fine as well if the popup link wouldn’t surprise me so often.

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      I’m salivating after those ligatures. If only ligature support was available in a sane manner in Emacs.

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        I get programming ligatures in Emacs, but then, I’m using the Mac build, and font that has the ligatures in it (Iosevka).

        (mac-auto-operator-composition-mode t) ;; enable ligatures
        
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          I use vim on the terminal and ligatures in Iosevka work just fine. But it does require a terminal emulator with ligature support.

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          One of the things I always liked about Courier Prime is that is has an actual italic face (not just a slanted face that’s called italic). Same for the Latin Modern and Computer Modern fonts.

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            Very happy to see that fantasque mono made the list. This is your semi regular reminder that fantasque is the best font. :)

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              I rather like Go Mono. It has a certain elegance.

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                Hm, on which browser does this work with?

                I have Firefox and Safari and both look the same, https://imgur.com/a/THtllZ2

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                  Works fine for me on Firefox

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                  On the subject of programming fonts, I decided to give a serif-heavy font a try - the one I’m using is actually on this site, Verily Serif Mono. I’ve been using it for the past few months and I haven’t looked back.

                  EDIT: more thoughts

                  I like that you can change the target language, but I was expecting the sample code to change as well, to match that language. That’d be really handy.

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                    Envy Code R seems to be missing.

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                      Possibly because it is not a free font and the author specifically disallows redistribution (as would be required for a web font):

                      These files are free to download and use from damieng.com but CAN NOT be redistributed either by other web sites or be included in your package, download, product or source repository

                      This also means that if this site ever goes down with the author missing the font is lost forever.

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                        Aww, a pity. That’s of course a good reason to omit it. Thanks for pointing it out.

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                      Alas, I lament the world where the default language is JavaScript.

                      That said, this is quite neat, even though I’m a typeface heathen who doesn’t much notice font differences as long as it’s monotype. If we got a programming font in Fraktur or with a sweet s-t ligature I might pay attention, but until then…

                      That said, the example text shows the actual differences very well; a very good choice.

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                        Eh, just view the JS as the lorem ipsum of code font comparisons.

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                          Alas, I lament the world where the default language is JavaScript.

                          This is why I found the web site of Pragmata Pro oddly appealing, as it has samples in Haskell, Agda and APL (for which it includes special characters).