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    Interesting that they have 8-inch disks in stock. As I recall, these are still used in the US nuclear launch control systems. I wonder if this is company is the weakest link in US nuclear security. If so, that’s a somewhat terrifying thought.

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      I mean, honestly, the best thing for the world would be if the nukes all just secretly didn’t work, but none of the other countries knew that, so I for one welcome our obsolete floppy drive overlords.

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        On the subject,

        The United States has not detonated a nuclear weapon in thirty years.

        This raises a troubling question: do they still work?

        Because the only designs that have been subject to “real” quality control testing (by detonation of sample units) are more than 30 years old and thus have undergone radioactive decay, mechanical wear, maintenance and refurbishment activities, etc., and an increasing portion of the stockpile consists of designs that have never been tested, this assurance must make the directors a bit nervous. Our confidence in the nuclear stockpile today rests on subcritical testing, testing of individual components, and increasingly, computational modeling. It is exactly because of the challenge of stockpile assurance that a surprising portion of the world’s most powerful computers are owned and operated by the Department of Energy.

        https://computer.rip/2022-09-13-the-nevada-national-security-site-pt-2.html

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          I mean, honestly, the best thing for the world would be if the nukes all just secretly didn’t work, but none of the other countries knew that

          That’d make a great science fiction short story. Nuclear war comes, but then all the scientists involved have to admit they’ve independently sabotaged their own arsenals to prevent armageddon.

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            Dr. Strangelove with a conscience: “Of course, it makes no sense to actually fire the rockets, so they are all sabotaged.”

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              Could also be a weird inverse-Hanlon twist … “No-one ever knew whether the failures were deliberate or accidental, but they saved humanity.”

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            It’s more that if you can introduce a PDP-11 exploit on an unformatted 8” floppy that causes things to detonate in their silos then you may have some problems. I hope the DoE does something to new floppies to prevent anything malicious coming in, but I doubt that they have many people who understand security for these systems left. Most of them retired a while ago.

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              If they don’t work it will be secretly, regardless if anyone knows the truth - https://wikileaks.org/trident-safety/.

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              Looks like the USAF finally moved to SSDs in 2019.