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    Is anyone else skeptical of his claims that games represent significantly better software than anything going on in other industries? A) Game engines solve the same set of problems over and over again (as do web applications). They solve many hard problems by convention. B) Games get to make assumptions about the operational parameters – the code runs on one machine and for one set of inputs and outputs.

    I see where he’s coming from though

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      I think his claims are sound in most cases on technological grounds and not wasting cycles for stupid stuff - though that’s no longer true with most Unity games and triple A titles just aiming for launch hype and ignoring quality.

      There is a second side to the story though. Games are HORRIBLE when it comes to security practices. I doubt it will be easy to change and I’m just waiting for the first black hats targeting exactly that market directly (no, infected torrents don’t count).

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        I want to make sure I understand you before responding: you’re equating web app quality with game quality, from a software engineering perspective?

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          The speaker does too.

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          Is anyone else skeptical of his claims that games represent significantly better software than anything going on in other industries?

          I think there may be some historical truth in it, if only because the “Agile Scrotum” fad took longer to hit gaming, because games require at least a few seriously competent (and, therefore, also too old to put up with “user stories” and two-week “sprints”) engineers, especially around graphics, AI, and performance.

          That said, I’ve heard that this Agile Scrotum nonsense has infested the game development community as well. In which case, the quality has presumably collapsed.