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    This is a stream of consciousness/wall of text that’s mostly a political polemic that feels like it was written 25 years ago, but addressing specific points (there is a LOT to address, but a subset regardless):

    • A mention of Xbill, but no M$Micro$oft. It could be getting off on a worse start, I suppose.

    • Secure boot is required to allow you to enroll your own keys, and remove Microsoft’s. And of course, boot your own OS. If it doesn’t, the vendor fucked up, end of story. Having other OSes be signed with those keys is convenience. You’re missing out on a lot of security features otherwise, and it pisses me off when people fail to understand it.

    • I no longer like ThinkPads. but for very different reasons (comment thread) from the author. His specific complaints feel so small potatoes (i.e. the LEDs), to be honest.

    • I have a dim view of “repairability” - just because it can be fixed, doesn’t make it worth it, nor does the fact its repairable make up for other sins (i.e. defective design that requires repair). Of course, the decisions for repairability also enact failure points (i.e. sockets and slots, which have mechanical failure), and the long march of VLSI has overall made things more reliable and integrated at the cost of modularity. I’d rather use my nearly 8 year old MBA which has required no maintenance and has a good battery (overall far outliving the typical lifecycle) still over my ThinkPads which have required it and aged like milk left out in the sun. (Most of the time when opening a ThinkPad, it’s to clean out the fans… which before the supposedly reviled Haswell area models, was much more annoying to do.)

    • Since we’re off-topic in the first place, a business prediction: Framework is either going out of business or committing a cardinal sin that pisses their fanbase off within 5 years.

    edit:

    • “That’s really the least of my concern, but since I paid more than 1k€ for this and it was sold for 2.5k€ new, I believe I have the right to be picky.” Wait, when did you pay 1k for this? You got scammed hard if you’re paying over a thousand for a a ThinkPad from ~2014.

    • “Ok, 3k was a bad idea, I hate not seeing individual pixels and my eyes are getting older so I had to force it to FullHD resolution.” But that’s the point of high-DPI?

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      I have a dim view of “repairability” - just because it can be fixed, doesn’t make it worth it, nor does the fact its repairable make up for other sins (i.e. defective design that requires repair). Of course, the decisions for repairability also enact failure points (i.e. sockets and slots, which have mechanical failure), and the long march of VLSI has overall made things more reliable and integrated at the cost of modularity. I’d rather use my nearly 8 year old MBA which has required no maintenance and has a good battery (overall far outliving the typical lifecycle) still over my ThinkPads which have required it and aged like milk left out in the sun. (Most of the time when opening a ThinkPad, it’s to clean out the fans… which before the supposedly reviled Haswell area models, was much more annoying to do.)

      I care strongly about the repairability of the battery - which is really the replaceability, since lithium ion batteries are a perishable item. I really hate having any kind of electronic device where its effective lifespan is limited by how long the battery can keep being recharged, and I prefer to buy electronics with user-replaceable batteries over ones with non-user-replaceable batteries at any opportunity. Repairability of other items on the laptop is a secondary concern, although not an unimportant one in my view.

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        No such thing as non-user-replaceable for a user with enough determination :)

        Though something like the Microsoft Surface line where e.g. even the Surface Book is actually a tablet rather than a laptop so you do have to unglue the screen to replace the battery is quite horrible.

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          When you hit a point where you need to replace cells, it gets awfully close to that. Here’s a decent description:

          So checking the PCB again I found a curious small circuit which burns a non resettable fuse when problems are detected, trashing the battery.

          That’s a different kind of fuckery than the glued-in-behind-the-screen thing.

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            Lithium cell replacements is a massive annoyance that I’ve seen few. (It’s one of the biggest misses with Framework - either standardize a prismatic form factor, or make it easy to pop up raw cylindrical cells.)

            Regarding in existing laptops: I don’t really care if it’s done with a screwdriver. The cells should last for years (cough unlike a ThinkPad) so it shouldn’t be a common operation.

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        I started writing a response to this article, but the more I read the more I realized it was pointless. It has all the tired old tropes ranging from “firstly, it’s GNU/Linux” to “Microsoft wants to establish a fascist dictatorship with secure boot!”

        I will say this; if this is intended to communicate something in the direction of Lenovo – as hinted by at the title – then he certainly succeeded in that goal, although I’m pretty sure what it communicated to Lenovo is quite different from what he intended to communicate, assuming someone from Lenovo even reads this (probably not – I hope not anyway).

        I really hate this kind of stuff because it’s a bad look on the entire community.

        “That’s really the least of my concern, but since I paid more than 1k€ for this and it was sold for 2.5k€ new, I believe I have the right to be picky.” Wait, when did you pay 1k for this? You got scammed hard if you’re paying over a thousand for a a ThinkPad from ~2014.

        That does seem a bit much, although ~€1k does seem to be the going rate if I search W541 on NewEgg. The W range are usually pretty darn expensive; comes with nVidia Quadro cards and fancy stuff like that.

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          He really, really needed an editor here if he wanted to get his point across. It felt like I was reading three articles with their pages spliced into each other. It might have been the same rant, but more direct to the point.

          price

          Hmmm, here W541s seem to be going from 350-700 loonies (former a bit high but reasonable, latter seems nuts tto me), around 250-480€. Not including shipping or tax, FWIW. Electronics are fairly expensive here, so I think he absolutely overpaid.

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            That does seem a bit much, although ~€1k does seem to be the going rate if I search W541 on NewEgg. The W range are usually pretty darn expensive; comes with nVidia Quadro cards and fancy stuff like that.

            Yikes. The going rate on eBay US seems to be around $385 for W541s with Core i7-4600, 16GB, 512GB with Quadro K1100M/intel hybrid graphics. The €1k range feels like more than double what you’d spend for one of those + shipping from US + an appropriate power brick. I’d go so far as to call it “scammed hard”. Particularly since OP’s description reads more like an individual sale than a shop like NewEgg.

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            I have a dim view of “repairability” - just because it can be fixed, doesn’t make it worth it, nor does the fact its repairable make up for other sins (i.e. defective design that requires repair).

            This is a fairly nuanced viewpoint, and I’ll try to respond in similar vein. It doesn’t have to be either-or.

            I think the strongest defense of the repairability movement is that it is leveling up our society by raising consumer sophistication. We want consumers to make purchasing decisions based not just on short-sighted feature lists but secondary effects like the holistic UX, total cost of ownership (durability) and commons effects.

            In this context, repairability adds a new component to a product’s “fitness vector” without replacing any existing concerns. If the design is defective in obvious ways we already have ways companies compete on that.

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              I mean, I bought my phone from the “I do not want to buy another phone for >5 years” angle. Repairability is a useful metric, but I think it’s as you say, nuanced.

              To be more clear, I feel the right-to-repair movement is picking the wrong battles, because engineering and economics are about trade-offs. Soldering things down actually can increase reliability and reduce the need for repair, and is usually a natural consequence of integration, and things like slots are mechanical points of failure. When was the last time you had defective L2 cache since it all went on-die? Likewise, waterproofing makes it harder to service but reduces the likelihood of needing a repair. (Per friends who work in the e-waste world: Macs after they started soldering things down tended to be far more reliable and almost never broken when they hit recycling than their predecessors or contemporaries. Unfortunately ancedata, would love harder statistics)

              Another example: who cares if I need a screwdriver to replace the battery, if replacing the battery isn’t needed because proper power management increases its lifespan to 5-10 years? The interval between replacements is long enough that opening the thing up wouldn’t be a bad idea, and it may have exceeded its expected lifecycle after some replacements anyways. (that is, it’s moved beyond daily driver capacity, because the platform has aged too much and isn’t up to the task anymore/electrically incompatible with upgrades, parts no longer made, or the system has physically worn out and is no longer economical to service)

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              When I was in college, I recall being adjacent to a community of ThinkPad enthusiasts. One of the tropes of this community was an emphasis on reusability and swappable components. The ThinkPads were not just beloved like stuffed animals, but also hackable like stuffed animals.

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              Author, in summary: “Computers, they don’t make them like they used to.”

              Me: “F@$%ing yes, friend.” *continues typing on virtually unrepairable work Mac*

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                I enjoyed the tone. Quite refreshing in a world of widespread self-censoring.

                Some good points, too. But also some odd fixation in crap that doesn’t really matter.

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                  This was quite a piece. I have to say, in principle I agree with most of it in here, but the way it was argued is just too vitriolic and somewhat (dare I say it?) juvenile. Also, at the very end the author hints at better options that do fit their demands, but then dismisses them offhand without even going into details.

                  I say - put your money where your mouth is and buy one of the several offerings like the Framework, MNT Reform, Pinebook pro or one of the System76 or Purism laptops. I recently had the opportunity to get a new laptop from work to replace my aging Lenovo. That machine was quite a letdown which belied Lenovo’s reputation, so I decided to give the Librem 14 a try. It’s a fairly decent laptop with some pros and some cons, but more importantly, it’s a way of voting with my wallet.

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                    I mean. Yes. This just seems entirely correct.

                    (Though I think this is one case where it’s Linux, not GNU/Linux- not like the drivers are different on say, Alpine.)