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Adding Nim to the blogger’s list of “interesting new languages since 2000”

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    Most advanced statically typed languages completely SUCK in the programmability department. Unless you are some genius of course.

    It feels like all people who say things like this haven’t actually tried learning the more “advanced” languages. Haskell is my main language I work in and is IMO really easy to both learn and program in, you certainly don’t need to be a genius or even smart. The whole point of having the compiler is so that you don’t have to be smart.

    It always feels like a cop-out, because the rumours are that languages like Haskell are academic, you relegate them to “you need to be a genius to use them so I’m not even going to try”.

    I may also be biased on the matter of course, but I have yet to find someone that learnt Haskell go “this is too complicated for me”. I do wonder how much of it is bias and how much of it is true to the authors point.

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      It feels like all people who say things like this haven’t actually tried learning the more “advanced” languages. Haskell is my main language I work in and is IMO really easy to both learn and program in, you certainly don’t need to be a genius or even smart. The whole point of having the compiler is so that you don’t have to be smart.

      Is your background in functional or imperative programming?

      For people with extensive imperative programming background, the paradigm switch can be very hard and Haskell as a language is very unforgiving unless you’re FP all the way. It can certainly feel like you need to be a genius to make the leap.

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        I went PHP -> ASP.NET -> Rails (stuck around here for like 8 years) -> Clojure -> Haskell

        Perhaps making the mind-switch into FP using Clojure was a more friendly path than direct to Haskell.

        I think I understand the feeling though, that FP is so “different” that you have to change everything you are to, start working with it. However, I don’t think that feeling is validated once you actually start trying. Most people I’ve seen pick it up have gone “oh, well, that was easier than expected..”

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      It seems though that perhaps people are “waking up” disillusioned in Go land, just like many did after getting seduced by NodeJS.

      The author is very critical of Go and even describing users of Go as beginning to turn their back on it. I agree with the criticisms of Go but I’m not sure I have seen any evidence of the user community “waking up” like the author describes. Is there any evidence of this?

      To be clear: I am not asking for anyone to defend Go, I’m curious if there has been any sense of people in the Go community feeling that Go is not delivering on its promises.