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      OS X has been using it for a while - 10.11 uses libressl too.

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      I won’t be upgrading just yet:

      1. Karabiner is broken
      2. Fujitsu ScanSnap software (which I use with my ScanSnap scanner) has all sorts of problems (see also this post). Urgh, it’s been available to developers for ages - why have Fujitsu not fixed these issues yet, although they suggest it’s a macOS bug?

      :(

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        Fujitsu ScanSnap software

        Ugh, why are printer and scanner companies so bad at software across the board.

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          Re-reading the issue, it’s a weird one. It seems that you don’t even need to use a ScanSnap to suffer the problem - somehow old files just scanned by a ScanSnap can get corrupted. That sounds like an OS issue, but Fujitsu are working on a fix? Or maybe they’re working with Apple on a fix?

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        This version of macOS 10.12 cannot be installed on [Macbook Pro, mid 2009]

        shakes fist

        I don’t see any technical reasons why it wouldn’t work.

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          Ars Technica’s review couldn’t find any rational thing in common across the hardware they dropped. The most likely thing was simply that they’re making software support match the 7-year hardware support window,

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            Quite often if it’s not a technical reason people will soon find workarounds to trick the installer into running.

            Edit: as an addendum to this even if there IS a technical reason, workarounds are sometimes found, I believe the 2006ish Mac Pros could be tricked to run Mavericks IF you upgraded the graphics card.

            Edit 2: http://dosdude1.com/sierrapatch.html

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              Yep, there’s an active community of people who run OS X on unsupported Macs. AFAIK 2006 Mac Pros can run El Capitan and, I’m pretty certain, Sierra.

              It does get trickier with non-upgradeable hardware though - eg, older MacBooks and Mac Minis, which can experience graphics issues when newer releases are shoehorned in (primarily because Apple removes the drivers for that hardware and so drivers from older releases are hacked in).

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              I’ll probably be staying where i’m at with my MBP 2008 for two more years until security updates stop coming. I guess the choice comes then as to what to do. Switch to xubuntu or try these workarounds people will come up with.

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                You must be really looking forward to the MBP refresh :)

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                Weird, considering that 2009 MacBooks and iMacs are still supported (and AFAICS both the 2009 MacBook and MacBook Pro have NVidia 9400M graphics). Sadly my mid-2007 MacBook Pro didn’t last long enough to make it onto the “unsupported” list - it was killed by the infamous NVidia GPU issue.

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                  Sometimes it’s graphics; sometimes it’s CPU or chipset issues. Apple doesn’t do this purposefully to make people upgrade; they just make a cost/benefit analysis when a planned feature would cause some older machines to fall out of their support window.

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                GHC and/or Cabal is also broken for projects with a large number dependencies. Beware if you’re a Haskell user and depend on Stack-sized projects (Yesod and Stack both appear to use every package on Hackage).

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                  Do you guys recommend a clean install or upgrade?

                  and also any tips for faster upgrade process? I know one, remove all homebrew packages and re-install them again later

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                    I installed this morning on my MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013) from the previous version, no issues so far. It took about ~20 mins.

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                      I always recommend a clean install. Treat operating systems as immutable. Store all your data and customizations elsewhere, that way you can assume this machine gets blown away and you’re not stuck.

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                        That’s a really good approach. Try as I may, I find it incredibly difficult for my workstations not to become “special snowflakes”. I do store my dotfiles in a VCS, but it’s all the other stuff that’s a pain…

                        Boxen is very appealing - maybe one day…

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                      I’m still running Yosemite on my machines at home. Haven’t found a compelling enough reason to move yet :)

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                        Security patches, for one. Apple doesn’t fix security problems in old versions. They expect you to be running the latest Mac OS, all the time.

                        edit: Also forgot - 10.11 fixed long-standing memory management issues as well. It’s definitely worth it.

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                          They do fix security issues, usually two versions back.

                          Last security fix for Yosemite was Sept. 1st