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    This is so great. There’s a nice little easter egg in the HTTP headers

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      One of best companies to work for. Happy to see the wayfarer reactive framework used this way! And libblonde is also pretty cool.

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      Shameless plug: I’ve been running putsyes.com and putsno.com for a few years now that you can just CNAME a domain to.

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        You guys should make it a business together. The marketing buzzwords you’re looking for are “immutable bit-buckets”.

        To @izabera: I’m sorry for an unintended almost-DoS. I wanted to post a script here that would fetch and display a short message from a few buckets. I used a simple design, where I generated a “bucket prefix” and then stored individual bits in bucket_prefix + {0, 1, ..., a, ...} etc. After every 8 bits, there was a bit signaling if there was one more byte.

        Apparently my judgement failed me as I didn’t realize before I executed the script that the message “Starting at just $1 per bucket, our revolutionary immutable bit-buckets are the perfect solution to satisfy your business’es everyday storage needs.” would create 1332 files (that’s a pretty leet number!). When I realized it, quite a few of them have already been created, so I let the script finish.

        But it didn’t work anyway. With no error handling, some bits probably got lost on the way. I don’t have time to debug it as I have to go to sleep. Please do run rm 4b56be65-224c-47e8-886e-171a5e151406-* as this is the prefix I used.

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        I think I broke it, doesn’t seem to be able to handle this question:

        http://istheanswertothisquestionno.ynaas.com/

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          Feature request: “it’s complicated”

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              They don’t prevent, but they do reduce, or perhaps inhibit.

              Clearly I need a domain for this knowledge.

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                if you were going to infect 20 people without a mask, but instead you infected 10 people with a mask, the mask prevented 10 infections.

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                  But what you really should have done was stay at home when you had symptoms indicating you’ve got a transmissable disease. Even mild symptoms. Then you wouldn’t infect anyone.

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                    If you were going to crash into two ships but only crashed into one, did your actions prevent a crash, or just reduce the damage from your crash?

                    In your scenario, the mask prevented ten infections. It did not prevent the spread. It inhibited infection (the 10 may be asymptomatic or experience fewer symptoms due to lower volumes of virus).

                    We have a rich and very fuzzy language, let’s agree to use the wide variety of words we have to express ourselves.

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                      We have a rich and very fuzzy language, let’s agree to use the wide variety of words we have to express ourselves.

                      oh stop with this this tone-policing, “everything has to be about how polite we are” nonsense. Both of my parents had Covid. One of their friends died of it.

                      This isn’t a thought experiment. It’s not a game. It’s not a simulation. Your semantic thought experiments wind up convincing people not to wear a mask because they “don’t prevent the spread”, a conclusion so plainly false on its face that it’s ridiculous. When somebody says “masks prevent the spread” they’re not saying “if you put on a mask the virus is instantly eradicated”. When “ten fewer people get infected” gets countered with “it did not prevent the spread” all you’re showing is that you are more convinced of some abstract argument about semantics than other people’s actual lives. What is the result of you “being right” in this argument, downplaying the efficacy of mask-wearing? An asymptomatic observer concluding you’re in the right might say “you know, maybe I shouldn’t wear a mask, it doesn’t actually prevent the spread”, infecting someone they might not have otherwise infected.

                      I’m not going to play this toxic game of dandy politeness where we curtsy and bow and say “good day” “I disagree with your argument! but disagreement nourishes the mind!” and giggle about how much disagreement makes us wiser. Your ego is literally deadly. Your ego is literally endangering other people’s lives.

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                        Why do you think I don’t wear a mask? I’ve got one next to me at my desk at home right now.

                        Do you think that lying using language and saying masks mean nobody will get corona (prevent) is better than the truth of inhibit?

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                    WHO has your back:

                    “However, the use of a mask alone is insufficient to provide the adequate level of protection and other equally relevant measures should be adopted” 1

                    They have also said that asymptomatic carriers rarely transmit:

                    “Current evidence suggests that most transmission occurs from symptomatic people through close contact with others.”2

                    http://canyoumakemewhereamask.ynaas.com/

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                      Thanks for the WHO reference, a quote from the website expands a bit on your summary.

                      Accordingly, most recommendations by WHO on personal protective measures (such as use of masks and physical distancing) are based on controlling transmission from symptomatic patients, including patients with mild symptoms who are not easy to identify early on.

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                        WHO has dispensed too much of damaging advice this year.

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                      Do people hate dashes in domain names or something?

                      http://do-masks-prevent-the-spread-of-corona-virus.ynaas.com/

                      ^– is more readable in my opinion.

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                      LOL.

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                        This is awesome. And written entirely in bash as well. I really like the way it’s written. I never thought of writing http server in bash, but it makes perfect sense when you think about it. In the end, http protocol was designed for this. I might steal this idea later.

                        Btw, is it secure to let people create random files in your filesystem? I’m on phone so I can’t properly test it, but isn’t there danger of path traversal?

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                          He strips out slashes, so I don’t think so.

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                            This certainly is pushing it! It accepts “.”, “..” and flags to ln, but there are no flags that you can use to make ln do nasty things, AFAICT. I tried -i, which indeed seems to send the server into an endless loop waiting for “input”. So a resource exhaustion attack might be possible, if you can hit the max open file descriptor or pid limit.

                            With -f as subdomain, I’d expect it to delete the target file, but unfortunately the check whether the target is the same as the source comes first…

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                              Thanks for noticing the flags, I forgot that GNU tools are stupid and take flags after arguments.

                              EDIT: No ok there’s no excuse. I’m an idiot.

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                                Does it really accept flags? Input should be split by spaces because of read if I’m not mistaken.

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                                  ln "$yn" "$subdomain" with $subdomain equals -f, you get ln yes -f or something like it. Because of how most programs work, flags don’t necessarily need to come first. To fix this particular issue, it should read ln -- "$yn" "$subdomain".

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                                    I think I broke it, with -fbdrs as subdomain; this force removes the target file (which is yes or no) by creating a backup and then linking it to itself. Or something…

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                            Too bad it doesn’t support Unicode characters. I created random.ynaas.com giving a negative answer, and also wanted to create a homographic variation ra∩dom.ynaas.com (where instead of n I used U+2229) giving a positive answer, but it failed. So I just went with randorn.ynaas.com which is perhaps even less distinguashible than the original (it obviously depends on the font you’re using; for me, in the terminal the former looks better, while here it’s the latter).

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                              You could have made it work by just entering xn–radom-jh6b instead of ra∩dom in the text field (which I did, and now it works).

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                              curl -i -H “Accept: application/json” -H “Content-Type: application/json” http://doesynaassupportothermimetypes.ynaas.com/

                              too bad…

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                                Can someone ELI5 why this is interesting? Or maybe ELI66. I don’t understand.

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                                  It’s a take/parody on sites like http://isitfridayyet.net/, but you don’t have to set up your own domain. Hence “as a service”.