1. 4
  1. 3

    If the author’s here, grapheme clusters are an important concept to know on top of UTF-8:

    It is important to recognize that what the user thinks of as a “character”—a basic unit of a writing system for a language—may not be just a single Unicode code point. Instead, that basic unit may be made up of multiple Unicode code points.

    One example from the unicode.org page on Grapheme Cluster Boundaries is g̈, which is two unicode code points:

    0067 ( g ) LATIN SMALL LETTER G

    0308 ( ◌̈ ) COMBINING DIAERESIS

    I actually really like that they included a Hangul example as the second example, because despite looking like Chinese logograms, the Korean alphabet actually works very similarly to unicode grapheme clusters in that each morpho-syllabic block is a bunch of jamo glued together:

    1100 ( ᄀ ) HANGUL CHOSEONG KIYEOK

    1161 ( ᅡ ) HANGUL JUNGSEONG A

    11A8 ( ᆨ ) HANGUL JONGSEONG KIYEOK