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    As an active user, this makes me sad. However, I’m confident some other service (or many) will take over and provide the service I’m looking for. I currently user Reeder and am not sure what I’m going to use next. Any suggestions?

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      Feedly dropped right into my workflow without skipping a beat. NewsBlur’s developer was still putting out fires when I tried it, but it usually shares the top two slots with Feedly in lists.

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      I used Bloglines for many years, until it got bought and got a UI change that made it ugly. It was threatened to be shut down in 2010 because “RSS was dead”. For three years after that, Google Reader was the most popular RSS reader and is now getting shut down because RSS is dead again in 2013. Maybe these companies should stop proclaiming RSS to be dead while shutting down a service with many thousands of users and instead just say “we don’t want to do this anymore” and leave it to another company.

      Back when Bloglines got a UI change, I created den.im in 2009 which was basically a clone of Bloglines' old interface. When I was dragged onto Twitter, I saw it as just another feed of items to read, so I added Twitter support to den.im. Maybe I’m weird in that I actually want to read every tweet that comes across and keep track of unread ones like RSS feeds, but den.im has archived every tweet I’ve seen and posted since then. One thing I particularly like about it is that it also generates meta-items that show up in my timeline when people follow and unfollow me, and I can do direct messages, retweets, and follow new users directly from it, for multiple Twitter accounts.

      Over the years I improved the UI of den.im, added search functionality, added Facebook feeds (and then removed them because apparently their API doesn’t export the same things that users see on facebook.com, or so I was told), and made the mobile web interface. I’m now the only user of it, because my beta users abandoned it for Google Reader (and are now asking for den.im access again). I have no desire to put in all of the extra work to rewrite parts of it to scale better and support lots of users, but I haven’t found any other site that I want to switch to.

      I hope something new comes out of this Reader shutdown that I can switch to so I can stop making and hosting my own reader. I also hope it does something to spur on the progress of RSS or whatever comes next, since it promotes an open web instead of putting everyone’s content behind things like Facebook and Google+.

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        I have no desire to put in all of the extra work to rewrite parts of it to scale better and support lots of users, but I haven’t found any other site that I want to switch to.

        Perhaps people are willing to pay for this as some kind of subscription? I would, especially if the privacy handling is right. I always felt sharing my interest with Google was … bad (like in “if a service has no price you are properly the product”).

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          I couldn’t agree with your comment more. I had built my own RSS aggregator years back (minus the cool domain name) , but I left it for Google Reader years ago as I just wanted something that could be maintained by someone else. Now I’m a man without a country!

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          I was genuinely surprised at how many people are still using Reader. I stopped using it a couple years ago (too many feeds), and recently started using Prismatic. I just had a problem with too much noise and not enough signal, and even experimented with some data mining on feeds to pick out relevant stuff. What are people going to switch to?

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            I did a quick test of https://kiza.eu/software/snownews on a ssh enabled box. After a bit of fiddling with filters it seems usable. Not smooth, not elegant, but working.

            Another alternative could be https://feedbin.me or http://theoldreader.com/, while we are waiting for jcs@ to build a privacy respectful, good looking, paid addon to lobste.rs :p

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              I used to use snownews and canto, but my biggest problem is too low of an SNR in the feeds I was interested in. I’ll poke around the other two links, I guess.

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                I never understood the text-mode and dedicated clients for RSS readers. All of the content is in HTML, it’s designed to be viewed in a web browser, and to do anything beyond the article like open links, you have to open a browser anyway. Why not just keep it in the browser?

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                  The main issue here – for me at least – is not the client, nor the way the information is formated, but keeping track of what is read and what is not. And being able to do this on a set of machines. This smells like a webservice …

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                    Most of the articles I was reading rendered just fine in lynx. Most of the images were just boring “here’s a stock photo I found on whatever stock image site that looks appropriate”. If I thought that it would benefit, I still had commands to open the feeds in Firefox.

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                A friend and I just built http://replacereader.com/ to find the best replacement for google reader. It took us all night definitely check it out!

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                  Really nice. Good job!

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                  I’m wondering what the developer of Reeder is going to do in response to this. Currently the iPhone version also supports Fever but the Mac and iPad versions are locked into Google Reader.

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                    The reason why I used Google Reader was to have almost ubiquitous access to subscribe to any feed I desired, and have that persisted. It was really nothing more than a chrome extension and a database, to me. I use Reeder on the Mac or Flipboard on the iPhone to actually read the articles, I almost never go to the Google Reader interface.

                    My question is…are there any software packages I can use for this purpose that I can run myself? I don’t mind setting up a simple Heroku app, what I don’t want is to have to pay for a service that in my opinion isn’t very bandwidth-intensive and that I could manage myself for free.

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