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    If only one could write a piece of software for fun, as a hobby, as an exercise, as a learning tool, or simply because they need it… And just publish it in case it is useful to other people…

    Instead we have silly one liners like left-pad packed as a library with a license.

    When did this happen? When did hackers stopped hacking to engage in this licensing silliness?

    No offense to OP, but reading “I will explain why this matters” made me yawn.

    I could write an essay on why one don’t care, but that would kind of disprove my point. I’ll brew some coffee and work on a side project of mine instead.

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      I don’t see where your complaint is coming from. Plenty of people write code as a hobby, for learning purposes, or “just because”, and then release it just in case anybody wants to use it. That’s probably 95% of GitHub projects.

      But a project that’s actively seeking out users (as JSHint seems to be), isn’t being release “just in case it’s useful to other people”. If they want more users, they need to have a license that users are comfortable with. It’s always worked that way.

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        It was not intended to be a complaint. More of a lament maybe. I too am guilty and am part of those 95%. Was just challenging the meaning and even the usefulness of the whole thing. Not trying to blame anyone or a specific group of people in particular. Although the other comment that mentioned the FSF did make me giggle.

        Somewhere along the way, we let a too large slice of our energy to be directed towards what is ultimately irrelevant from a hacker’s perspective.

        Imagine you visit your grandmother and she cooks your favourite dish the way she did since your childhood. That is all you would want, I’m sure you wouldn’t want a lecture about the legalities of the recipe before you can touch the food.

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          Imagine you visit your grandmother and she cooks your favourite dish the way she did since your childhood. That is all you would want, I’m sure you wouldn’t want a lecture about the legalities of the recipe before you can touch the food.

          I mean, true, but food enjoys this privilege because recipes are still not covered by copyright. There are no people being sued (under copyright law) for having cooked a recipe.

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        When did this happen? When did hackers stopped hacking to engage in this licensing silliness?

        Well, the FSF was founded in 1985…

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          When did this happen? When did hackers stopped hacking to engage in this licensing silliness?

          Licensing is itself an opportunity for hacking - the GNU GPL is itself a rather clever hack of the intellectual property law system.

          I wouldn’t call software licensing “silliness” in any case - the legal terms under which software can be distributed is within the legitimate purview of people who care about writing software.

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            And just publish it in case it is useful to other people…

            So long as it has a license that allows those other people to use it, this seems like the whole point? There are only like three real choices (GPL-or-so, ISC-or-so, Apache-or-so) for a hobby project, just roll the dice (or follow your principles if you have some) and copy the same COPYING file into every project. Doesn’t seem like a massive burden?

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            Looks like that was a huge amount of work. Very impressive that he brought it all the way to this conclusion.

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              I think it might be too late when everyone uses other linters without that wacky license nowadays. It’s hurt other projects too.

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                It’s hurt other projects too.

                Well, the fault here is on Mono’s for including code without checking the license first. If I write some software and release it online, then it’s up to you to decide if you like the software and the license. Nothing compels you to use it, and Crockford doesn’t “endanger” anyone by uploading a piece of code to the internet. People only endanger themselves by using random bits of code without properly auditing it.

                I mean, I think it’s silly too, but it’s his code, and I don’t think I or anyone else has any authority to tell him what he “should” do with it.

                efforts to pollute the Free Software ecosystem with fake, non-Free software as evil

                lol? So now everyone should use a FSF-approved Free Software License? Yeah, this sounds exactly like “free as in free speech” to me 😒

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                  i have to admit, i burst out laughing when i read the last bit about crockford working for paypal.