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I wonder why and how is this even possible to create a window hidden behind the taskbar?

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    Title is misleading. Browser isn’t closed, just the tab.

    A pop-under window opened by offending website remains mining.

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      I like how the demo video very carefully hides the taskbar to make sure you don’t notice this.

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      Surely, there must be some browser that throttles background activity? :P

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        Can you confirm, that firefox on windows does not exhibit that problem? (I don’t know how I could check that myself.)

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          Not without digging a bit further.

          What I can confirm is that Firefox doesn’t allow new windows (popups and popunder) below a minimum size of 100 x 100px

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            Why does it allow them a all? Even if you want JS to open windows (I don’t), it seems like a mistake to not force it into a background tab. Let alone allowing JS to control placement.

            I’d like to see popups disabled entirely by default.

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              Firefox does block them by default Popups can be useful in the workflow of some web apps and Firefox allows users to whitelist by domain.

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                From that page:

                Is the pop-up shown after a mouse click or a key press?

                And

                Certain events, such as clicking or pressing a key, can spawn pop-ups regardless of if the pop-up blocker is on. This is intentional, so that Firefox doesn’t block pop-ups that websites need to work.

                Sketchy websites game that. Just disable popups entirely. Delete the code, and be done with it.

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                  You’re breaking my workflow! For serious, actually, I use a pop up window to present slides driven by the main window.

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                People are already trained to answer permission requests ‘this site wants to send you notifications allow/deny’. Isn’t it a good time to block opening new windows/tabs/popups via JS by default and prompt the user for a decision?

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                  The sad truth is that people are trained to click “Yes/Allow” for their thing to work. But yes, the popup blocker should disallow most new windows, unless provoked by a true user gesture (modulo bugs, of course).

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                    The sad truth is that people are trained to click “Yes/Allow” for their thing to work.

                    nothing sad about that. What you actually mean is that a majority of people do that, but that doesn’t justify not giving the minority a choice.

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            It was once normal to browse the web without a form of ad blocking software. Now, unless you were to restrict yourself to a very limited set of sites, you really need ad blocking software to browse. As more sites abuse javascript to run these type of things I see either ad blocking software getting more complex and adopting crypto mining blockers or new browser extensions that further sandbox javascript in some way becoming more popular.

            For a few months now I’ve been using multiple browsers. I’ve configured Firefox, my daily driver, to completely disable javascript via NoScript. Most sites still run fine, although they might have some rendering issues. When a page doesn’t work or is impossible to read I switch over to Chromium (which just has ad blocking).

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              I’ve configured Firefox, my daily driver, to completely disable javascript via NoScript. Most sites still run fine, although they might have some rendering issues.

              I’ve been using NoScript for years (maybe a decade?), and while this used to be true, more and more sites are requiring JavaScript in order to work at all. I’m really not a fan of this trend (HTML is already quite capable of displaying text and images), but I don’t know how to stop it.

              I recently switched to uMatrix; it allows first-part JS by default, and seems pretty useful overall.

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                Yes umatrix is pretty great. Though I still keep ublock on for certain first-party ads.

                My workflow typically involves using the tor browser at safer settings to open websites and switch to firefox with umatrix whenever I have to login to something.

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                I categorize browsers by levels of blocking. Chrome is the daily driver with moderate blocking - ublock and some extra plugins to stop autoplaying video. Firefox is for heavy blocking, with ublock as as a strictly configured noscript, for anything that has too many annoying scripts and ads even in Chrome. And IE/Edge/Safari for no blocking, for anything that I can’t get to work in the other 2 and am willing to live with whatever weird stuff they do.

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                Since no antivirus will do something and some adblockers won’t block it. I’ll just post my five cents

                127.0.0.1 coinhive.com www.coinhive.com
                
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                  I’ve been trying this for a while, and was happy to find coinhive already in it when I heard about it a few weeks ago.

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                    Awesome, I had never come across a curated list of that kind.