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    A few important take-aways for those not reading the full comment text:

    • This isn’t removing it, just saying it is orphaned. A lot of things in the Linux kernel tree are orphaned and it will probably be years (or a CVE) before it’s actually removed.
    • This is only the “legacy” µPD765/8272A controllers, not USB FDCs which are still vaguely useful - especially for those damnable Intel boards from the earlier 2010s that need them to flash BIOS updates.
    • In 2015 I tried to fit the kernel and busybox on a 1.44M for my 486. I couldn’t do it then. It probably hasn’t gotten any better; when Adélie bumped GCC 6.4 to 8.3, binary sizes went up about 5%…
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      One thing I liked about them is intrusion detection was easier when I could hear them checking the blank disc I had in there. Caught a buddy that way who slipped SubSeven into a game he gave me. Of course, it was unnecessary given he turned on the Matrix feature next.

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        First they came for the floppy disk controller drivers, and I said nothing for I did not use floppy disks.

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          Die, floppy disks. DVDs and audio jacks: you’re next.

          Just kidding about the audio jack.

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            I bought a new phone recently, and I was so mad (at Google, but also at myself for not checking) to find that I had to use USB-C headphones and that I had to install and configure them before they worked. Why is this necessary? (It reminded me of the first USB key I got in ~1999—it was utterly useless because I needed to install drivers for every machine I used.)

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              Not only that, I’ve seen people move their USB Type C 3.11 for Workgroups with Power Delivery charger around each port of their computer to try and find the one which will actually accept power. There are tiny dark-grey-on-black hieroglyphs next to each port on my new laptop marking which ones are USB Type C 3.11 for Workgroups with LightningStrike or Thunderbolt OSR2 Enhanced or whatever it’s called, while others are USB Type C 3.11 for Workgroups with DisplayPort alt-mode LTS Edition. Thank god my eyesight is in normal human range; I’d hate to try and work this out with vision difficulties! The laptop will only boot from USB Type C 3.11 for Workgroups Mass Storage Edition on certain ports, and blithely ignore boot media in others. This is unmarked and undocumented, so my passable eyesight is no help here.

              The cable situation is even worse. There are a zillion different types of cables, which are supposed to have markings (i.e., black-on-black embossings that nobody will be able to see). These will allegedly identify which cables are base USB C 3.11 for Workgroups, and which ones support delivering a value meal along with your data, or whatever other hare-brained scheme they cram in there next. Presumably they’re following the logic of whoever makes SD cards: make them look like NASCAR jackets and maybe people will learn what all the weird symbols mean. But of course most of the cables are made in China and are totally unmarked, so the iconography is moot. The only cable you can trust is the one that came with your gizmo.

              We’ve gone from having function-specific ports that were visually distinct, though an all-too-brief golden age of “match the plugs and it’ll probably work”, to a bunch of function-specific ports which all look the same. Anyone involved with USB C 3.11 for Workgroups should be deeply ashamed of themselves, with the exception of that Benson guy who calls people out on their terrible cables.

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                Not only that, I’ve seen people move their USB Type C 3.11 for Workgroups with Power Delivery charger around each port of their computer to try and find the one which will actually accept power.

                So rather than acknowledging that when companies do the right thing, and make all USB-C ports accept power, it’s easier for the user, you instead choose to blame the standard which allows said ease of use, on the shitty manufacturer who implemented it in a half-assed way to save a few dollars.

                The laptop will only boot from USB Type C 3.11 for Workgroups Mass Storage Edition on certain ports, and blithely ignore boot media in others

                Yet again, completely unrelated to USB - your laptop is a POS.

                We’ve gone from having function-specific ports that were visually distinct, though an all-too-brief golden age of “match the plugs and it’ll probably work”, to a bunch of function-specific ports which all look the same.

                We’ve gone from dozens of single-use ports that are fucking useless for the user if they don’t happen to have that type of peripheral, and will make the peripheral useless with their next computer because the specific set of single-use ports will have changed and converters are simply not practical or available, to the ability for manufacturers to provide ports that are multi-purpose, and can connect multiple legacy single-use ports with inexpensive, readily available adapters.

                This same argument (single-use ports are better) is made about even expensive laptops, like the MacBook Pro. People whine and whinge about the lack of HDMI and fucking SD card readers - and ignore that they’re completely useless for a whole bunch of people.

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                  So rather than acknowledging that when companies do the right thing

                  I have literally never seen anyone do this completely right.

                  You instead choose to blame the standard

                  No, I blame everyone. You know this industry: the ideal world specified by a standard and the set of implementations people must interoperate with are often two distinct worlds.

                  […] connect multiple legacy single-use ports with inexpensive, readily available adapters.

                  The few adapters I have seen have neither of these properties. Sitting a laptop in a plate of dongle-spaghetti is not an improvement. And then you have to break out your magnifying glass to find out whether this particular adapter talks DisplayPort alt-mode or DisplayLink. Reading online, one is painless and the other is impossible.

                  Oh, and: this is painful enough for people who work with tech for a living. I feel for all the normal people who have had this shoved onto them; I have no idea how anyone not immersed in this stuff could make head or tail of it.

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                    I have literally never seen anyone do this completely right.

                    Apple’s TB3-supporting computers all do it “right”, and even their now-discontinued Macbook (which had USB-C but not TB3) did it “right”, from what I can see.

                    The few adapters I have seen have neither of these properties.

                    Few? Have you actually looked for any? USB-C to <Insert combination of USB-A, Ethernet, Some form of video, Some form of card reader> are ridiculously common amongst accessory makers.

                    Sitting a laptop in a plate of dongle-spaghetti is not an improvement. So, before USB-C was a thing, the devices somehow didn’t have wires? With adapters you’re doing one of two things:

                    • you’re connecting one or more devices via single-port adapters - in which case you just have a slightly longer cable(s); or
                    • you’re connecting multiple devices to a single multi-port adapter - in which case you’ve moved the ‘spaghetti’ of multiple cables away from your computer..

                    And then you have to break out your magnifying glass to find out whether this particular adapter talks DisplayPort alt-mode or DisplayLink.

                    I don’t even understand this complaint, unless you just searched for “weird proprietary confusing display tech” and got a result for DisplayLink. The manufacturers who support it in hardware seem to be limited to those who also make the same shitty decisions like “hey we’ll put 8 USB-A ports, but only 2 of them are high speed, guess which”.

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                Annoying, isn’t it? And they can’t undo the decision.

                The flipside is that I just carry around wired earpods in my pocket wherever I go. It’s okayish.

                I keep telling myself “They need that room on the hardware for other things, like AR.” But I’m unfamiliar with hardware engineering, so that’s just a bedtime story.

                The worst is that all the adapters for car <-> phone are useless now. And bluetooth cars aren’t really prolific, at least among my family members.

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                  I think the reality is that they save a little bit of money on the BOM by leaving out the jack and associated components, and when they sell thousands/millions of units they earn a bit extra.

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                    Adding to your BOM idea, it’s also more expensive to waterproof an audio jack, from what I have heard.

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                      I’m not the expert, but I don’t why waterproof headphone jacks would be more expensive than waterproof USB ports.

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                        You already need to have a USB port, so a headphone jack is one more thing to waterproof/IP certify.

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                          But is the cost of that anywhere near significant on the total cost of developing a new phone that will sell millions of units?

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                            Bean counters are that way… There was a managed switch by Ubiquiti where the OS had serial console support, the board had the controller, and even had the RS232 header in place, but the port was not soldered. Some people ended up cutting a hole in the enclosure and soldering the port to it.

                            That would be a very cheap addition with a lot of value for the customer. But someone probably got a bonus for saving $0.01 per unit.

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                              That’s kind of my whole point above.. saving a few dollars on a unit when you expect to sell millions of them adds up.

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                                That only considers the cost side. There’s also a benefit side: more people interested / not turned off, so you sell more units. If cost is low enough, adding a feature is a no-brainer. I wonder about the math here.

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                                  That’s not what is happening though. It would seem that consumers are ‘too invested’ in the Apple brand, for example, to move away entirely from the product line when Apple decides to remove features.

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                          Yes, I think it was so claimed by Apple when they got rid of the headphone jack and added IP67 dust and water resistance — both in the same iteration with iPhone 7.

                          TBH, it doesn’t necessarily make much sense — what’s the big deal with simply designing a proper IP67-rated headphone jack component like they already do with all the other parts?

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                    I’d be fine using Bluetooth everywhere if it actually heckin’ worked. I tried to pair my phone with my car once to play music without an aux cable. Never again.

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                      What’s wrong with DVDs? They’re now so wide open pretty much anything will play them.

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                        DVD-ROMs are okay, but video DVD format builds on top of PAL/SECAM/NTSC analog television with interlacing, which is too harsh legacy. It’s basically a crudely digitized VHS. It have to go just like Kodak Photo CD, despite jpeg, maybe, is even more ancient tech.

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                          Image quality is what’s wrong with DVDs IMO.

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                            I literally don’t have a device in my house that will play DVDs. I have two 2018 computers (one mini desktop, one laptop), a 2011 laptop, and a 2018 (purchased, probably 2017 model) receiver.

                            The weird thing is my car will (apparently, I’ve never actually tried it) play a DVD.

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                              They lose data very quickly. Even allegedly archival quality DVDs