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    I loved Tiger back in the day. Mac OS X was well-polished and stable, unlike how it is today. The slow demise of Apple’s operating system was visible on the horizon beginning in 2011, which is why I left for Linux in 2013.

    I’m not saying the current macOS is horrible, but there is obviously much worse software quality, less testing, lackluster documentation, glitches and lots of instability. The system overall has become much less flexible, especially in regard to running your own software. You still get work done, and many do of course, but Mac OS X used to be on an entirely different level compared to Windows and the Linux desktop, but now it has lost a lot of this “magic” and seems to only remain an option for hipsters, sysadmins (where you only ssh into everything), cinematographers and graphic designers.

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      but there is obviously much worse software quality,

      I have used macOS since Tiger. There was definitely a regression around ~2011 to 2018, but macOS 11 and 12 have been stellar for me. I haven’t encountered any serious bugs.

      Also, people tend to glorify older times. I ran into a fair share of bugs with Tiger/Leopard. Even Snow Leopard starter out pretty rocky, though later Snow Leopard updates made it stellar.

      You still get work done, and many do of course, but Mac OS X used to be on an entirely different level compared to Windows and the Linux desktop, but now it has lost a lot of this “magic”

      I beg to differ. I have made a Linux/Windows desktop excursion for a little over 6 months on a laptop and ~2 years of Linux besides macOS on the desktop. But macOS is much more comprehensive and a more stable platform than Linux. On the other hand, much less noisy and messy than Windows. However, for me the magic is in the integration with iPhone, etc. The amount of integration between devices and services is unparalleled in any other system.

      And the M1 Macs have only made the delta compared to Linux and Windows larger for me.

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      When I was young and just getting into computing on my first hand-me-down Windows laptop, I happened to run across a copy of Mac OS X Snow Leopard: The Missing Manual and, being That Kind of Kid, read through it cover-to-cover on a train to Oxford.

      QuickTime, Automator, and AppleScript completely blew my mind, especially compared to the multimedia apps and Windows batch files I was using at the time. I was absolutely convinced that this was the best operating system in the world, and I begged my parents to give me the thirty dollars I’d need to buy an install DVD. I got as far as Googling “osx snow leopard system requirements”; I don’t think I’d ever been more crushed in my life to discover that the software would only run on a machine I had no hope of affording for ~10 years. By that time, I was firmly entrenched in the Linux ecosystem, and Mac OS wasn’t any good anymore anyway.