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    I’ve got a “vanity” phone number by total luck: over a decade ago my wife and I were buying new SIM cards along with numbers and I told her if one of the numbers were a prime I’d like to take it. Surprisingly, the my number turned out to be a prime and it’s still prime after prefixing it with my country code.

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      I must admit, that’s very cool!

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      Twilio’s API makes it very convenient to do fun phone hacks - plus you can wire it straight into your existing phone number as you’d like. I’d recommend it pretty strongly; the only headache I’ve found is that some places that require a phone number will reject signups using Twilio-owned numbers.

      Back when “going to conferences” was a thing I’d buy a number and forward voice/texts into my phone. Then I could drop the number when the conference was over, before the sales droids started cold-calling it.

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        the only headache I’ve found is that some places that require a phone number will reject signups using Twilio-owned numbers

        Phone numbers, at least those under NANP (North American Numbering Plan), are usually tagged as “residential” numbers or “VOIP” numbers. Twilio and most other VOIP numbers are marked as such and sometimes rejected when sending 2FA SMS or otherwise used for signup.