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    A frustrating view of history. Many of the 70s & 80s debates against computing “priesthoods” were being carried out by people like Kay who wanted to take over the function of the priests themselves. The author’s disdain for button-pushing appliances leaves out the kinds of things that such devices allow their users to do, like writing stories, publishing online, organizing communities, creating visual art, or recording music. I was a Logo kid but also a Mac kid, and I found so much more potential in tinkering with photoshop than drawing yet another turtle spirograph.

    Apple once used the phrase “bicycle for the mind” when describing computers and I think it’s apt: a minority of cyclists love wrenching on their own bikes, but for a majority of people a bike is a way to get fit and go places. Let the bike shop techs fix your derailleur when it goes wonky.

    As a follow up I would be curious to learn whether the popularity of black box systems like Macintosh impeded the parallel evolution of hacking? I would guess no, but alternative histories are hard to prove.

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      As a follow up I would be curious to learn whether the popularity of black box systems like Macintosh impeded the parallel evolution of hacking? I would guess no, but alternative histories are hard to prove.

      ResEdit had quite its own hacking scene, and an accessible one at that.

      edit because I forgot to include:

      I do agree a lot with what you say. I think we tend to forgot not everyone is into computers for the sake of computers - they want to do other stuff with their computer; it’s a means to an end. I certainly am, but I know not everyone is.

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        I spent so much time in ResEdit. One of my favorite fun activities was modifying PICT resources in games to make my own themed variants, like a ghoulish skull-kicking version of Pararena. If I had known about the hacking scene at that time I would have been so, so into it.