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    Point of attention for all the readers: remember that the demographics of StackOverflow are not necessarily representative of the whole sector. Some numbers clearly don’t match (for example the ones about freelance work/precarious work in US). So take all these numbers as representative of a very specific sub-demographic.

    That said, the viz is dope.

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      That said, the viz is dope.

      Two changes I think would make it more dope:

      1. Easy access to the actual question that was asked: Sometimes the text summary makes you wonder what the exact wording of the question was.
      2. Quite a few of the graphs just show an average, when they could also show some indication of the spread of data. For example, instead of the bar chart showing median salary for each language, I think it would be more interesting to see a ‘box and whisker’ graph, or even an actual frequency distribution for each language.
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      I like this year’s redesign. No question about VCS for the second time confirms, at least to me, that Git has gone way over 90% adoption and that SVN and Mercurial are under 10% maybe. Just speculating. The fact of the matter remains that there it is not worth asking the question anymore.

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        This page looks terrible on a vertical monitor :(

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          Rust again landed as the most loved language. I’ve noticed it has also climbed up into top best paying languages. Most likely due to its relatively young age it has an exceptional (years of programming experience)/salary ratio.

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            climbed up into top best paying languages

            Has it actually climbed up there from a much lower position, or do languages tend to start with a small band of well paid programmers and gradually spread out downwards to lower-paid programmers? I would guess that the companies driving adoption of new languages tend to be big companies paying relatively high salaries.

            Most likely due to its relatively young age it has an exceptional (years of programming experience)/salary ratio.

            I don’t think it’s quite as simple as that, as I believe (It doesn’t appear to be specified?) it’s the years of programming experience with any language which is measured, not the years experience with the language in question. A young language that had high uptake among experienced programmers would have a high experience figure.

            I wonder if their survey is consistent enough from year to year that they could plot some trends over time.