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    Facebook is becoming our de facto social-credit system.

    To some extent, this is true of LinkedIn as well. I don’t have a LinkedIn account (and I reluctantly have a Facebook account) and when I tell people they seem surprised. There’s this notion floating around that you need a LinkedIn account to stay employed. It’s not true, nor is that actually happening, but the rumblings I hear in casual employment-related conversation suggest it’s hanging around.

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      I’ve never found any sustainable work from LinkedIn, or had my profile looked at seriously by prospective employers. Its more of a relic from my early days in college.

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        I’ve never had a single interesting job offer from LinkedIn. It’s almost all recruiter spam for really generic business programming jobs that clearly don’t match my interests. Most of my appealing job offers come from my github or my website.

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        Just file a complaint to the company. If enough people don’t have Facebook accounts and file complaints then companies will “realise their lost revenue” by allowing privacy aware people to use their services. If not enough people complain the company doesn’t listen then you are stuffed anyway.

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          All of this probably because some jackass decided to use OAuth+FB instead of putting on their big kid pants and deciding to own their own user system.

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            That seems like a naive view. Minimizing sign-up friction helps get people on your platform faster, which can be helpful for a company. I’m not saying it’s good for the world but using FB for signups can be a very rational intelligent decision if you’re optimizing for your own financial longevity.

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              Sure, as long as that is not your only option. Otherwise you are only share-cropping on FB.

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                One way that seems to side-step this, is to allow FB login. Once this is done, use the data scraped from FB to auto-populate another account that’s unique to the website in question.

                It also means, if Facebook ever deletes/suspends the user, the user can still login via existing credentials. In effect, using Facebook to jump-start your own website.

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                Well, if they’re tying their success to dependence on someone else, then I guess it’s for their own longevity up to the point where they can get bought, at least. Which makes sense from a purely short-(maybe medium-)term self-interest perspective. But … does literally no-one, anywhere, ever, try to balance their own financial longevity against what’s good for the world, even if only from the perspective of enlightened long-term self-interest?

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                  You’re saying slightly conflicting things, I think. Talking about long-term but there is no reason a company couldn’t add non-facebook signup in the long-term. In the short-term, making it possible for 2 billion people to easily sign up for your product could help quite a bit. Limited time/person power/etc.

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                    Fair point, maybe not conflicting, but perhaps inconclusive. Although having 2 billion people sign up for your product straight away might cause more problems than a young company could handle ;-)

                    My point though, really, is just that it seems a shame that more people don’t try to accommodate or balance with what’s good for the world at any stage - and I think the reality is that if they don’t do it from the get-go, then the likelihood they’ll try to start later down the line, once they’re already invested in systems that don’t, seems even lower.

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                  Minimizing sign-up friction helps get people on your platform faster, which can be helpful for a company.

                  Sure, but remember that according to the article, they already owned their own user system. The acquirer decided to break that.

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                    Then offer a choice: login with Facebook, Google, or another 3rd-party login system, or register an account with their system. Presto: low-friction signup for those that want it, and privacy-aware signup for those that care.