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    I feel like it’s worth mentioning that some people feel like using Beamer is a bit of a curse. Nothing makes a presentation less engaging than piles of equations, tiny source code, and bullet points, but that’s precisely what Beamer makes easy to add.

    I think some of the javascript libraries for presentations are a better fit as they make it easy to embed videos, animations and transitions that guide the eye to what matters. Unless you need to be able to send someone a pdf of the presentation, I’d hesitate to recommend using this library without large amounts of discipline.

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      I think what’s going on here is that too many people have been sitting in university rooms listening to boring lecturers giving excruciating presentations made with Beamer and filled with hundreds of bullet points.

      Not that I’m the biggest Beamer expert out there, but I use it for all my slides and I think the results are pretty good.

      I think some of the javascript libraries for presentations are a better fit as they make it easy to embed videos, animations and transitions that guide the eye to what matters.

      Animations, videos and transitions can be abused exactly like bullet points. In an effort to escape the boring-lecturer-effect, we should be careful not to err on the side of entertainment and produce presentations filled with animated gifs and almost zero content (I’ve seen many of those too, lately).

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        I think some of the javascript libraries for presentations are a better fit as they make it easy to embed videos, animations and transitions that guide the eye to what matters.

        Unless you want to print the slides..?

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          Nothing makes a presentation less engaging than piles of equations, tiny source code, and bullet points, but that’s precisely what Beamer makes easy to add.

          At university this has become quite popular. Instead of lecture notes we just have densely populated beamer presentations, which seem neither to read during a lecture nor to read when learning.

          I think it’s a pity that many of the more interactive features of beamer beyond \pause are just forgotten, ignoring seemingly all principles of good presentation-making.

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            I’m not clear even the advanced features really help. I think it matters what makes a tool easy to do.

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              This is why I despise Beamer. Also it is a pain to use compared to alternatives.

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              I totally agree! I have used reveal.js with pleasure and success, though I used only a bare minimum of the features, as I find most stuff in presentation software distractions not attractions.

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                What javascript libraries do you have in mind? l’m a heavy (disciplined) Beamer user and, like @ema, think I produce quality slides, but I am curious about other tools for programatic presentation generation.

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                  Truthfully, these days I use reveal.js with Jupyter notebooks (https://github.com/damianavila/RISE)

                  I’ve used deck.js, reveal.js and eagle.js. Aside from needing to futz with npm these have all been perfectly adequate. Thanks to MathJax, I can still put in an equation if it’s needed. For some of them you can even use pandoc to generate the html directly from markdown https://pandoc.org/demos.html.

                  Like I said, if you are disciplined, Beamer can work really great. For me what counts is what the tools encourages you to do and not to do. From that standpoint, a lot of tools would have trouble outdoing sent

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                  That’s interesting to know. I’m in the process of converting my workshop slides from PowerPoint to beamer. Most of the slides are either code, short definitions, or diagrams, and I wanted to be able to easily find/replace my slides. They’re there to frame the live coding sections, so hopefully the plainness won’t be too much of a problem.