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    Someone, somewhere, is surprised. I’m sure of it.

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      Someone should create a website that grabs these twitter threads and creates a blog page out of them

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        There are a few different sites like that. Here is this thread as displayed by threadreaderapp.com.

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        Is this legal in Europe? In Australia if not being tracked was considered legally to be a “common law right” it’s not possible to opt out of it.

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          I think we need to wait and see, as GDPR will go into effect on May 25 and probably a number of practices like this one will be challenged legally. I personally feel this give-your-consent-or-so-long approach is not in the spirit of the law.

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            If it’s not legal, they’ll make it legal and sugar-coat it with GDPR in a way that’s impractical or infeasible to the users.

            I hope Facebook users can combat this with addons, but as most users are mobile users, they surely lack the addons or the technical know-how to set it up.

            Just opt out of Facebook already.

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              I hope Facebook users can combat this with addons

              At some point, the person being abused has to acknowledge that they are being abused, and choose to walk away.

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                Yeah, just opt out. But sadly there are people who, say, expatriated and have no better way to stay in touch with old friends.

                Until a viable replacement comes along, which may never happen, I think it’s a nice hope that they can find a way to concentrate on their use case without all the extra baggage.

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                  I am an expat.

                  I manage to keep in contact with the friends that matter, the same as I did when I didn’t use Facebook in a different state in my home country.

                  If they’re actually friends, you find a way, without having some privacy raping mega-corp using every conversation against you.

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                    Agreed, I don’t buy the argument that Facebook is the only way to keep in touch from afar.

                    I’m an expat, and I have regular healthy contact with my friends and loved ones from another continent, sharing photos and videos and prose. I have no Facebook account.

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                I hope Facebook users can combat this with addons

                Then this will happen: https://penguindreams.org/blog/discoverying-friend-list-changes-on-facebook-with-python/

                Unfriend Finder was sent a cease and desist order and chose not to fight it. I made my own python script that did the same thing, and ironically, Facebooks changes the fixed the Cambridge Analytica issue broke my plugin. It stopped 3rd parties yes, but it also kept developers from having real API access to our own data.

                I also wrote another post about what I really think is going on with the current Facebook media attention:

                https://fightthefuture.org/article/facebook-politics-and-orwells-24-7-hate/

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                You’re not forced to use Facebook. It looks like they’re following GDPR and capturing consent. It seems the biggest issue is the bundling of multiple things into one consent and not letting folks opt in or out individually.

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                  You realize it’s OK to agree with someone on one topic and disagree with them on another? A single opinion cannot invalidate everything a person has to contribute. I see a lot of people doing that these days. It’s dangerous and unhealthy.

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                    Sean Blanchfield and Johnny Ryan are the same person? Could you elaborate on that?

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                      It’s a conspiracy I tell you.

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                    I’m curious what other lobsters think Facebook should be doing?

                    Let’s assume that it’s not profitable for them to offer their service to the EU if they can’t track their users, since that’s the basis of their business. Should they offer “opt in to tracking or pay a yearly fee”? Should they just leave the EU completely?

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                      The “what should Facebook do if this isn’t profitable” question reminds me of the response to Taxi company’s being upset at Uber/Lyft cannibalizing their business: you don’t have a moral right to your business model, if it’s not profitable, do something else. We shouldn’t reduce quality of medical care because it victimizes undertakes.

                      If it’s not profitable, either don’t operate that service, or find some alternate business model that is profitable.

                      (FTR, I’m pretty dubious of the benefits of GDPR, but I think the “what about their business models” is one of the worst arguments against it)

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                        The “what should Facebook do if this isn’t profitable” question reminds me of the response to Taxi company’s being upset at Uber/Lyft cannibalizing their business: you don’t have a moral right to your business model, if it’s not profitable, do something else. We shouldn’t reduce quality of medical care because it victimizes undertakes.

                        I think the Uber comparison isn’t half bad.

                        For example, in Europe, a frequent problem was that Uber tried to undercut reasonable regulations (like having proper insurance for passenger transport and adhering to service standards like having to take any passengers). Here, Ubers approach was morally problematic (“moral” being local and all), and they tried to spin it as a moral issue and users choice.

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                          I’m not in the EU and don’t know enough about GDPR to make a comment on it specifically. I just asked what others thought Facebook should do if we assume that the restrictions placed on the by GDPR make their fundamental business model nonviable.

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                            Well, they should do as any other large company that suddenly found their business model regulated :). It’s not the first time this happens and not the last.

                            It’s their job to figure out, as much as it had been in their hands to avoid the discontent that lead to the GDPR from growing.

                            I’m not precisely enjoying GDPR either (I think it has vast flaws and actually plays into Facebooks hands), but Facebook is a billion-dollar company. “What shall we do now that winds are changing?” is really their question to answer.

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                          I’m curious what other lobsters think Facebook should be doing?

                          I can think of a few things, but monkeys will fly out of my butt before any of them happen. They could, for example…

                          • Mail everybody a copy of their data on solid-state storage.
                          • Destroy their databases.
                          • Shut down their data centers.
                          • Release all of their code into the public domain.
                          • Fire everybody with severance pay.
                          • Dissolve the corporation.
                          • Send Mark Zuckerberg back to his home planet.

                          Facebook is one of the cancers killing the internet, and should be treated like the disease that it is.

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                            Second option would be great, but enough of daydreaming :)

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                              You’re asking the wrong question.

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                                What ls the right question?

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                                  @alex_gaynor has the right idea above: https://lobste.rs/s/krca7n/facebook_now_denying_access_unless_eu#c_si5pn0

                                  The question “well what do you suggest then?” posed to people arguing against Facebook’s business practises implies some kind of self-evident virtuous right Facebook has to exist at the expense of all humanity’s effort.

                                  I do not agree with this position. The world was fine before Facebook came along, for many people is fine without it, and will be fine if Facebook disappears. Facebook is a leech on people’s private lives, minds, and mental health.

                                  It is not up to the common person to provide Facebook with a position. It is up to Facebook to provide a position for itself by virtue of being wholesome and useful to society. If they cannot, then that’s the end of it. I owe them nothing, no-one does.

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                                    It is not up to the common person to provide Facebook with a position. It is up to Facebook to provide a position for itself by virtue of being wholesome and useful to society. If they cannot, then that’s the end of it. I owe them nothing, no-one does.

                                    I agree, but if people continue to choose to use Facebook in the wake of the numerous controversies, then perhaps people just don’t value their privacy more than the services that sites like FB provide. FB is only as big as it is today because people use it.

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                                      I implied no such thing, and haven’t made a value judgement on Facebook or GDPR anywhere here. I simply asked what others here think that Facebook should do given the changed situation; I’m just curious as to what Facebook’s next moves could be.

                                      I find that question much more interesting than your condescending replies and tired opinions about Facebook, a service that I don’t particularly like and am not trying to defend.

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                                If lobsters is right, and adtech is dead in Europe, then it probably means companies like Facebook will start changing users directly. In a certain sense, I would rather pay upfront than have to deal with ads, but that’s then less money to spend elsewhere, however small the amount.

                                In short, I think the cat is out of the bag in terms of the internet, and I doubt there’s any way to get back to the Good Old Days of everybody hosting their own personal server out of their garage.