1. 22
  1.  

  2. 3

    The Living Computer Museum has a Unix v7 manual you can read.

    Also, if you really want to try out Unix on you can sign up for an account on their mainframe that runs v7.

    1. 4

      The living computer museum in Seattle is the best place to go in the city. By far my favorite place by a mile.

      1. 1

        I can second that, I could spend hours there just looking at stuff in the mainframe room they have in the museum. Once I was given a somewhat behind the scenes look at a VAX CPU that was being repaired. Super cool.

        1. 3

          For some reason, I can’t help myself, I always buy a raspberry pi at the shop. If you know if any groups who go there for fun, I would love to join.

      2. 3

        We have many more old Unix manuals, including v1, v8 and v10: http://man.cat-v.org. There’s also a blit emulator in 9front (requires v8 running in an emulator).

        1. 1

          Off-topic, but who is serving/maintaining cat-v.org? I know Uriel used to but don’t know how it got to the new maintainer(s) after he passed.

          1. 1

            sl.

      3. 1

        This was a fun watch. Rob Pike is sometimes criticized for having strong opinions (he’s anti- syntax highlighting!), but it’s nice to hear the experiences that helped developed them and the thought processes behind them.

        1. 1

          I’ve learnt to edit Go without syntax highlighting and honestly I don’t miss it at all.

          1. 1

            Syntax highlighting is definitely one of those areas where we should just let people do whatever makes them happy. If you’ve decided to give it up, that’s fine. I enjoy it, so I won’t.

            Rob has said some pretty grating things about both syntax highlighting as well as the people who use syntax highlighting – I think the criticism is usually more of the inflicting of the opinion than the strength with which it is held.