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    I didn’t realize it’s so hard to get the right PCIe specs & cards outside of server boards

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      There’s isn’t really that large of a need for consumer desktops to have this type of gear, so that makes sense to me.

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      That is a really complicated setup.

      At first, I was thinking that I can’t imagine what you’d want 25Gbit for. But then again, I moved recently from a 400Mbit cable to a 50-ish DSL and I really, really don’t like DSL. (Side note, they’ve just announced they’re laying fiber in my place, contract is signed and this time next year I could be on gigabit).

      I assume jumping from < 1Gbit to 10+ Gbit is just a natural next step. I mean, yes I don’t need that speed all the time. But it’d still be nice to click “Download” and just a minute later, the entire 100+ GB Elder Scrolls online is here.

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        That is a really complicated setup.

        It seems that he’s not even using multiple subnets - I’d say his setup is a lot simpler than mine. :)

        I could imagine having 25 Gbps at home, but I’ve just started to deploy 10 Gbps in my internal network (between a few hosts) so it might be slightly overkill for me as well. My current max is 1000/100 but I’ve only opted for 100/100 as I don’t need more, and since I can’t have 1000 Mbps in upload…

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          might be useful to scan the entire ipv4 address space in a couple of minutes (or even faster)

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            If your ISP doesn’t block you, that’s a great way to end up on threat intelligence feeds and labelled as a bot.

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              fine take a few more minutes :)

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          I guess that the NICs themselves are offloading the bulk of the package processing from the kernel, hence the amazingly low CPU usage seen in the article. Once you start adding features that limits the amount of offload your (massive) router will start to hurt from the torrent of packages.

          But wow. That setup is awesome!