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    Great article but it oversimplifies in one key place: you don’t just pay $100K and get access to the UNIX trademark, you pay $100K and pass a fairly large test suite to get access to the test suite. I’d be more interested in whether FreeBSD passes the test suite and, in particular, places where it doesn’t. The Single UNIX Specification has a bunch of areas that are underspecified, but it’s still a useful baseline.

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      I’d be more interested in whether FreeBSD passes the test suite and, in particular, places where it doesn’t.

      I don’t know, but it seems easy enough to check: http://www.opengroup.org/testing/downloads.html

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      From Wikipedia:

      Inspur K-UX 3.0 was also certified as a UNIX OS, although, according to the same website, its certification expired on 3 February 2019 and has not yet been renewed [6].

      So I guess from 2019 it’s not a UNIX anymore ;)

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        Sounds like they would have to pay more/again - just to sustain that UNIX certification.

        Exactly the same as with Red Hat trainings which are valid only for 3 years.

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        Rather poorly written piece IMHO.

        Currently, only 1 Linux distro holds a current certificate: Huawei EulerOS.
        https://www.opengroup.org/openbrand/register/brand3622.htm

        Previously, Inspur K-UX had it too:
        https://www.opengroup.org/openbrand/register/brand3617.htm

        Interestingly both are RHEL rebrands, i.e. they are basically the old CentOS Linux.