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    I was prepared to groan but there are some superb sentiments in here, well articulated. I’d be interested to know why it was written now and if it’s meant to signal any changes in direction for Firefox.

    These two lines stood out to me as things that mean a lot to me but honestly wouldn’t have expected to be said by Mozilla.

    Our strategy is to categorize [web] development techniques into increasing tiers of complexity, and then work to eliminate the usability gaps that push people up the ladder towards more complex approaches.


    …people have a user agent — the browser — which acts on their behalf. A user agent need not merely display the content the site provides, but can also shape the way it is displayed to better represent the user’s interests.

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      I’d be interested to know why it was written now and if it’s meant to signal any changes in direction for Firefox

      It’s more of a “justification” than a new direction: Background is that other browsers develop and ship APIs that are sometimes hard or even impossible to bring to the web platform without conflicting with the core values of Mozilla. Pushing back on individual standards can be time consuming and repetitive. (See https://mozilla.github.io/standards-positions/)

      Among other things, this document serves as a long form explanation of these core values.

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        Background is that other browsers develop and ship APIs that are sometimes hard or even impossible to bring to the web platform without conflicting with the core values of Mozilla. Pushing back on individual standards can be time consuming and repetitive. (See https://mozilla.github.io/standards-positions/)

        Thank you for that link! I took a look at the “harmful” section and I was shocked by the amount of bad ideas. And they keep coming! It’s great that there’s at least someone opposing this madness.

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          I will never get over the ultimate in bad ideas: the SVG working group trying to give SVG raw sockets access

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            You’re not serious?

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              Yuuuup, there’s quite a story, but basically it boils down to mobile phone software manufacturers in Japan (I think?) were required to implement things in terms of standards (or something like that). None thought a full browser was possible at the time, and the html5 spec was still in its infancy so hadn’t split out into sub-specifications yet.

              That meant that to get (for example) XHR they’d need to implement a full browser. Obviously such I thing was impossible on a phone :D

              The solution was to give the SVG spec everything that they needed, including raw sockets, an ECMAScript subset that only had integers, etc

              Suffice to say that when we implemented SVG in mobile safari we said raw sockets were not a thing that would happen.

              The SVG WG of the era was not the most functional.

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              Oh my gosh this sounds horrifying. Thanks for the explanation below!

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        The full document is worth a read too. See https://webvision.mozilla.org/full/

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          Mozilla’s vision is what people find in librewolf.

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            Meh. It’s not mozilla’s job to protect people from the web. This clearly hasn’t worked out so far and the issue isn’t with mozilla but with the economic system. The web is also not structured in such a way that it can be it’s own economic system. I believe the only way is to move the web to a different encoding but I am heavily biased.

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              Mozilla, the foundation says explicitly it IS their job. That’s the main purpose of Mozilla’s existence. The browser is just one of the tools to further those goals. Admittedly the most powerful and popular one that Mozilla has :)

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                I know they say that, I read the document you linked. I am explicitly commenting on that utterance.

                However, I don’t care what they say because I don’t trust them. They broke my trust repeatedly and even if I did trust them I still don’t think they are capable of protecting anyone from anything while also maintaining the lifestyles / salaries that they do.

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                  Basically this. They have a declining share of the browser usage for a reason. They have consistently taken away functionality that allowed me to personalize my experience to my needs and forced their vision down my throat. I finally had enough of the abusive relationship and moved on. I don’t want another vpn service or email service either. I agree with a lot of their points, but their actions directly contradict them.

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                    Moved on to what?

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                      Vivaldi. The things I really like are vertical tabs and tab stacks.