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    The article keeps saying how they really wanted it to be on 4.4.4.4 but stops short of explaining why that didn’t happen. Anyone know? Are the owners of 4.4.4.4 not willing to make use of that address? Is there a technical reason why it can’t be used?

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      Well, it seems that by the time they started their project somebody had already assigned 4.4.0.0/16 for DSL tests, and thus it was unavailable. As to what it can be done now with 4.4.4.4, I think this is left to Level3’s management. https://mailman.nanog.org/pipermail/nanog/2010-February/018291.html

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      still the site i ping reflexively to see if my internet is working

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        I don’t get it. Why on earth is every article about DNS recommending Google’s DNS server? I mean, it’s not like the world hasn’t operated a DNS server before 8.8.8.8…

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          Presumably because (like 1.1.1.1 & 9.9.9.9) it is very easy to remember.

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            Why does anyone need to remember the address of some 3rd party DNS server?

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              Because frequently ISPs have really terrible or slow DNS.

              RCN had a DNS outage that lasted days, which made my internet at home look like it had no connection to anything even though network traffic was flowing as expected. I switched to Google’s DNS servers because I never want to deal with ISP DNS again.

              I also updated some DNS once, which AT&T’s mobile DNS cached as nothing for far too long (making me suspect their negative TTL is like 2h+ long), and changing my phone’s DNS server allowed me to get at what I needed.

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                Using some DNS server, your own, or 3rd party, in no shape of form requires the operator to mentally memorize the address of said DNS server.

                I run my own DNS servers. I can’t tell you offhand what their IPs are. I only cared about that when I configured my DHCP server, and then I copy-pasted the IPs without having to commit them to memory.

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                  8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 are really easy to remember. They’re also known high-uptime IPs, so they’re really useful for troubleshooting a server to determine where in a network stack issues may be arising (if any).

                  I’m not recommending that everyone remember them, but if you use them enough times they start to stick around just because thats how brains work.

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                    How do you copy-paste them onto a device that doesn’t yet have a working DNS server, exactly…?

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                      Copy the IP from the file containing the DNS server IP into the file containing the DHCP configuration?

                      Sorry, I don’t understand the question.

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                        How does the file with the DNS server IP get onto the device in the first place?

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                          I write it?

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                            How do you know what to write?

                            You seem to be belabouring the point here but I’ll humour you.

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                              I know what to write in my config files because I know basic system and network administration so that I can plan a network.

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                                Good for you. For everybody else, there’s 8.8.8.8 ;-p

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                  Presumably for configuring a router or overriding the shitty DNS server provided by one’s ISP.

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                    I didn’t say you should not use some other DNS server, I asked why do you need to mentally remember the address of some DNS server.

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                      Because it’s faster than looking it up.

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                        Do you remember the IPv6 address too? I sure don’t. If you don’t remember the IPv6 address, what’s the point of remembering the IPv4 one?

                        Personally I always want to use my own DNS server, for many reasons including privacy, security, and local zones, and then yes, I do have to look it up. Never considered that to be a problem.

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                          You still don’t really need IPv6 for typical Internet usage.

                          Look, you can run your own DNS server if you want to. Nobody’s stopping you. But the overwhelming majority of people neither care to nor know how. For them it’s good enough to just remember 8.8.8.8

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                  Indeed, they are easy to remember. However, that’s not the point I want to made. Your upstream DNS can see/log/sell every (!) DNS resolution you will ever do. So if you’re are resolving helpmewithmymedicalissue.com or ilikethisp0rndomain.com they’ll know it. And since Facebook and Cambridge Analytica we know that they will sell it.

                  So please keep a list of trusted DNS resolvers or operate your own and add them to your systems.

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                    Google’s 8.8.8.8 does not store your IP address for more than 48 hours or sell it.

                    See https://developers.google.com/speed/public-dns/faq#privacy