1. 25
  1.  

  2. 13

    How do webmentions differ from TrackBacks?

    Trackbacks were notorious for spamming and I believe most sites disable them.

    1. 7

      IndieWeb seems to be rediscovering from first principles why we don’t do pingbacks anymore.

      1. 2

        You seem to be using “pingback” as a general term, while Trackback and Pingback are different, the latter was trying to address the spam problem. The main reason people stopped using them was the general decline in blogging during the time when people thought publishing on commercial platforms was a sound idea.

          1. 1

            Serious flashbacks, not all of them good ones. I see terms like “XML-RPC” and “Dave Winer” and the blood pressure starts to rise…

          2. 1

            Heh, that Pingback spec lists b2 whose creator I e-know and whom I have met in real life… nostalgia!

      2. 7

        Since lobste.rs has support, I guess we should see a mention showing up in the article on next deploy. Exciting!

        1. 3

          I’m gonna go force-restart it to update it now!

        2. 1

          First I’ve heard of WebMentions, what an incredibly odd RFC. What’s the need here and how does WebMentions fulfill it?

          1. 7

            I think it is a neat idea.

            It allows me to know when someone mentions one of my blog posts, so I can check what they have to say about it. If I ever need to, I can write a response to an article on my blog and let the original author automatically know about it, without needing to use their comment system (if they even have one).

            As a reader, if well implemented, it allows me to follow the discussion about a given article across the web (something I would have a hard time to do without it).

            I would define the need as: having a way to discuss and share ideas without the usual limitations of a traditional comment system.

            1. 2

              Well explained!

            2. 2

              Maybe this helps to understand it: https://indieweb.org/Webmention

              1. 1

                I mean, I get what it is, I just don’t get why it is or what it solves. In principle, it is a way to notify someone (if you choose) that you have linked to their site (if they support it). So is the need here to know when your site was linked to? This doesn’t really provide a complete view of that and seems to rely heavily on scraping services to tell you that someone linked to you anyway. Why even have the spec at that point? That’s what I mean by I don’t get the problem that this solves.

                1. 3

                  The “Indieweb” reason for webmention is to host your own comments/replies. If your comments on an article live on the server of the article, they can be removed. Hosting it yourself means more control over your content. If a service were to be taken down permanently, take medium.com for example, the comments from all the indieweb folks would remain online in some form.

                  1. 2

                    I lack the resources to scrape every new site that appears (or indeed the ones that already exist).

                    1. 1

                      But this doesn’t do that for you. It just gives someone the option to notify you if they want to.

                      1. 3

                        It tells me where I might want to scrape. You’ll never get everything, but you don’t have to.

                    2. 1

                      It enables communication in a decentralized web. Webmentions are like “reply”, “like” or “mention” notifications on Twitter. On the one hand it can be used as notifications, but it can also be used to automatically parse the source and display some context on the target, like comments.

                      For example, see the “Interactions” at the bottom of this page: https://jlelse.blog/dev/aoc-2020-day1-2

                      1. 2

                        Right, that’s still the what rather than the why. Assuming the why is “I want to have replies, likes, and mentions on my site for no specific purpose.” This spec feels like a poor way to accomplish that. There’s no verification of authenticity. You just get a GET request from something and post it on your site? Or don’t and just say you did? Or spam someone’s poor implementation for some free link backs?

                        1. 2

                          The spec (https://www.w3.org/TR/webmention/) includes verification (point 3.2.1 and 3.2.2). And it’s up to you how to process and display mentions or whether to display them at all. I don’t use any scraper service or social media like Twitter. It’s nice to see when people mention my posts though. And the spec is quite simple. It’s usually the first build block people implement when they get into the IndieWeb.

                          1. 3

                            I’m thinking about adding webmention support to my blog, and the reason is that I think it’d be fun see if and when someone references my posts and what they’re saying about them. Possibly I could reply to them if I think it’s warranted.

                            In my case I’d probably implement it as an email sent to me on each mention, and not automatically add links to the posts referenced (both to avoid spam, and my blog is static and javascript free, so it’d be complicated to do).

                            1. 1

                              Sounds like a good idea :)