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    I think the author demonstrates the attitude that many Rust users have. The developers have been nothing but helpful in IRC and everything is transparent in the paths taken for the language. Rust has a bright future ahead and will continue to gather praise as long as the culture of those who use it persists with it.

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        Thanks. We’ll see if we can hold the line post-1.0, when we (hopefully) get a huge influx of new users who aren’t used to our norms.

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          Today is the big day isn’t it steveklabnik? I just started looking at rust and I absolutely love it. Started to work at getting cargo ported to openbsd. Of course, I’m not one of those languages people… I’m a consumer to say the least. I look at a tool for what problems it solves and how it helps me add value to my situation. Coming from Go I think that the rust folks have fixed the dependency problem, and you didn’t incur too much overhead doing so.

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            It is! Glad you like it. :)

            I’d love to see more OpenBSD support. I have wanted to try out the various BSDs, but am afraid it would cause too much hassle with work…

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      I agree totally. I hate Rust myself and express my opinion as well, more or less rationally, but to be fair, the Rust developers have done a tremendous job in terms of implementing such a language in a more or less clean way.

      Future will tell how Rust will develop. Given my experience in the field, I don’t put the stakes too high, but given the enthusiasm, we have to see how it is in 1 year or more.

      In the end, everybody who loves C/C++ is not stopped from writing his code in that language. I think we should all just calm down and do what we love, instead of hating on each other too much.

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        In the end, everybody who loves C/C++ is not stopped from writing his code in that language.

        Unfortunately, most programmers do not get to decide what language they use at work. That should be fixed, but until it is, that’s one of the reason why there is much vitriol surrounding discussions of programming languages.

        On the other hand, if people are worried that they may be forced to use Rust at work instead of their beloved C++, I must say that sounds very far-fetched.

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          That is a very good point, sanxiyn! Often, development techniques are dictated by people who don’t know the matter well (people with economic or philosophical degrees) but think they do. This leads to incontent programmers and bad results, mainly also due to the fact that time is rare and there’s less efficiency using a language you don’t usually work with on a daily basis.

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            and there’s less efficiency using a language you don’t usually work with on a daily basis.

            Ironically, this is one of the reasons in favor of managers/architects/whoever forcing everyone to stick to a single language for all (or most) company projects. Individual developer preferences can lead to different projects being written in Java, Rust, Haskell, Ruby, and Python. Each of those choices may make sense for an individual developer’s productivity, but still kill the productivity of the team as people move from project to project.