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    This reads more like fragments from a brain dump for a draft than an actual post. Something about youtube ads and quic I guess, but I could use a little more narrative to tie it all together.

    Actually the takeaway for me is that Brave built their product on top of a tech stack they don’t understand. Why are they asking Google why quic ads aren’t blocked? They have the source. Look at it.

    Like this bullet point.

    Confirm, with appropriate supporting data, that their bid requests made with QUIC are not anti-competitive, and justify why bid requests are being used by a new and opaque request protocol under conditions where competitors are still using TCP with its extra round trip overhead.

    What does that even mean? I am peripherally aware of how adtech bidding works, but how does this relate to quic vs TCP in the browser?

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      The nut of is that Chrome doesn’t give extensions the ability to block QUIC requests. Adblockers (and presumably Brave?) use extensions to block ads over TCP, but can’t block Google’s QUIC ads. Brave can’t quite come out and say it directly because it would sound pretty ridiculous, but I think this is what they’re getting at.

      Confirm, with appropriate supporting data, that their bid requests made with QUIC are not anti-competitive, and justify why bid requests are being used by a new and opaque request protocol under conditions where competitors are still using TCP with its extra round trip overhead.

      This quote in particular was odd, any of their competitors can equally use QUIC. AFAICT QUIC usage isn’t whitelisted in Chrome.

      Show the Protocol column to view the QUIC requests in Developer Tools, without the user being required to locate and enable it.

      This is a single right-click on the toolbar if you care about it. And if you don’t (like 99% of people) then you don’t need to see it.

      Clarify how they’re using QUIC for ads and tracking. With Google’s dominance in the ad market, everyone should have a clear and well-documented rules about which protocols are being used for ad requests.

      Sure, it’d be good if there was a document out there, but I’m not sure what it would say other than “We use QUIC for ads and tracking”. Why should everyone “have clear and well-documented rules about which protocols are being used for ad requests.? There’s no effort to justify that statement here, but what I think they’re really asking for is a list of all the protocols and endpoints they need to block Google’s ads.