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    I noticed that this goofball quoted himself from Twitter a lot. That’s pretty thin beer.

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      “Nobody said it better than me!”

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        I mean, if you think your 140 character whatever is a strong argument, you can spare the 140 characters in your blog post to make that same argument. But if you’re just sort of handwaving at a lame appeal to authority, choose a better authority than yourself. Sheesh.

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        It’s a content marketing strategy. The idea is that you see his tweets and decide it’d be worth it to follow him on Twitter. Just a link to Twitter doesn’t put those tweets in your face, and 140 characters isn’t enough space to compel to you follow him.

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          Is there anything that Twitter can’t ruin?

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          It’s Apple navel-gazing, what did you expect–quality content?

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          I think Apple’s headed down a bad path. There hardware, though polished, is laughable from a usability standpoint for many people. Their software is buggy, bloated, fractured and slow (which is the main reason I switched to Linux 3 years ago - I’m much happier now). They’re going to lose out in the content game to Amazon or Google.

          Their “innovations” are parlor tricks that have no practical use (which wouldn’t be true if they just freaking opened up to developers more - let someone else figure out how to make their dumb products useful).

          I don’t get how they’re so blind to it all - sure it makes money, but it isn’t sustainable. I’m guessing within 10-15 years, they’ll disappear into oblivion again.

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            There hardware, though polished, is laughable from a usability standpoint for many people

            *Their. And I still haven’t seen hardware as quality as a MacBook Pro since my 2007 ThinkPad T61. Please, direct me to it.

            There software is buggy, bloated, fractured and slow (which is the main reason I switched to Linux 3 years ago - I’m much happier now)

            *Their. And I find Apple software is power-efficient, reliable, and well integrated. For everything else, there’s brew. I switched off Linux 3 years ago because I couldn’t stand how buggy the desktop environment was. Now I try to use Linux as little as possible because the kernel itself drives me bonkers. What sane developer would use an operating system without dtrace? Just BSD for me. Although in fairness to Windows, the Microsoft debugging and development tools are phenomenal.

            They’re going to lose out in the content game to Amazon or Google.

            Amazon video is abysmal to use. Google Play Music only seems good on operating systems where you have no desktop apps, like Linux. Apple Music and Spotify are both far better than GPM. iTunes has been the top online music vendor since release.

            They’re “innovations” are parlor tricks that have no practical use (which wouldn’t be true if they just freaking opened up to developers more - let someone else figure out how to make their dumb products useful).

            *Their. I love my Apple Watch actually. So do my friends. Apple should open up more, like Android? I had the Nexus 4 and the Nexus 5, they were garbage. My iPhone 6s+ is much better. My best friend is a die hard Android lover, and carries an iPhone for work, guess what? 9 times out of 10 he uses his iPhone when he needs to do something. His Android is just a toy at this point.

            I hear this story over and over. Android is pretty neat, but when it comes down to it I need my phone to do certain things well. My friends are some of the most die-hard dorks around, but even most of them have given up on Android. It’s too much work when phones are so fundamental to our lives now. You can only interact with a laggy UI for so many hours a day before you hit up the Apple Store.

            It’s the same concept with Linux on the desktop. You can only give up so many apps before you go get a laptop with a real desktop operating system. I did Linux on the desktop for 9 years, it’s not like I have no experience. I ran dozens of distros, every major desktop environment. I even was one of the lucky few who had Flash AND Pipelight working. But it’s not enough.

            I don’t get how they’re so blind to it all - sure it makes money, but it isn’t sustainable.

            They probably aren’t blind to it. They can see that sales are down these last few quarters, any loser can put 2 and 2 together from that. Maybe it has something to do with the recent upswing of quality from Microsoft. Windows 10 is pretty nice.

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              EDIT: wow. this got longer than I was expecting :P

              Oop - thanks for the grammar corrections - I swear, I’m normally better with it. I need coffee :P

              And I still haven’t seen hardware as quality as a MacBook Pro since my 2007 ThinkPad T61. Please, direct me to it.

              Are you talking about the new MacBook Pro? ‘cause a dual core processor and 8 GB ain’t gonna cut it for any power user or developer who uses multiple VMs at a time or works in Java. That combined with a wonky battery means an aesthetically pleasing design with no real power. I’ll grant that their older designs were awesome - the MacBook Air is great (currently writing this reply on an Asus ZenBook which is a complete ripoff of the Air’s design - I love it). Their old MacBooks were great too. I just don’t see it in their newer ones, and I’d argue that they’ve jumped on USB-C too fast. You know there’s a problem when you can’t buy a new MacBook and a new iPhone without buying a dongle to make them compatible.

              And I find Apple software is power-efficient, reliable, and well integrated.

              Sure, base software is fine (especially for people using it basically as a chromebook + spreadsheets), but I remember every upgrade borking my ruby environment and screwing with my C libraries. From a non developers perspective, I have a late 2013-ish iMac at home. It basically sits in the corner gathering dust, because I cringe every time I come near it. Why are app start times so long? Why does it lag when I type text? Why can it only handle 4 tabs at a time in Chrome before becoming unresponsive, despite having 4 cores and 8 GB of RAM? Why is startup time so long? Why are the graphical glitches at the login screen?

              These are all issues that don’t exist on Linux (even though I grant that there are a host of others).

              BTW is it a feature that crap like this has to be written, because Apple declares that iTunes must open when an iPhone is plugged in. At least Linus is broken in ways that make sense.

              For everything else, there’s brew.

              Sure, but that’s not an Apple product. Just because someone ducttaped on a nice solution doesn’t make the OS any better. Windows has Cygwin which is a nice POSIX environment, but I’d never use it for development when Linux is available.

              I switched off Linux 3 years ago because I couldn’t stand how buggy the desktop environment was.

              That’s a huge statement to make when there are hundreds of possible desktop environments out there. I generally go with a lightweight window manager and no compositing which makes everything run fast. The clarity of what’s running why is great too, and I can hack every part of my desktop I want to. It’s not for everyone, but it’s definitely less buggy than OS X and Windows.

              X is crap, and it’s a pain in the neck to reconfigure your graphics drivers and everything, but it’s not that big a deal once it’s working (most of the time) ;)

              Now I try to use Linux as little as possible because the kernel itself drives me bonkers. What sane developer would use an operating system without dtrace? Just BSD for me.

              BSD is awesome, and I actually prefer it over Linux. It’s way more unified and tends to work out of the box better. I just run on unsupported hardware at the moment, so it’s difficult for me to switch. My server runs OpenBSD though, and I love it. However, BSD isn’t an Apple thing, and Darwin is a bucket of garbage to configure from the CLI. I’d be impressed if anyone knew a bunch of launchctl commands off the top of their head. OSX guts are ugly, man.

              Although in fairness to Windows, the Microsoft debugging and development tools are phenomenal.

              I’ve only had experience with the Visual C++ compiler/debugger, and I gotta say, it wasn’t that great imho. The debugger was OK (and saying it’s better than GDB is like saying a car is better than a bicycle - GDB isn’t exactly designed to be user friendly and it’s not - Linux could definitely use a better debugger). C++ compilers in general are crap, since C++ is crap, but Visual C++ is buggy (I mean, there’s a post on the front page about that right now), and has error messages that weren’t any better than gcc messages. Besides, windows internals are a horror show.

              Amazon video is abysmal to use.

              Granted, but they’re getting more content for all their entertainment platforms (their music player for instance is usable), plus they have the Kindle. Amazon seems kinda sneaky to me at getting adopted in weird places (who would have thought a decade ago that Amazon would be The Cloud Computing Company? It shipped packages in snail mail! Right now, I’m sure they have a much smaller market share in streaming services, but I could see them growing.

              Apple Music and Spotify are both far better than GPM. iTunes has been the top online music vendor since release.

              Spotify completely wrecks Apple Music right now, and isn’t a large enough company that it couldn’t be acquired by Google or Amazon (or Apple, granted but they don’t seem to be pushing in that direction enough). With music shifting from mp3 downloads to streaming, Apple is going to be pressed hard to win with Apple Music. They got in on the streaming too late to compete effectively.

              I love my Apple Watch actually. So do my friends.

              Maybe I’ve been swayed by all the blog posts recently hating on the Watch. I don’t have any experience with smart watches, but I couldn’t figure out what the point of it was. What does it gain you that a FitBit doesn’t? (I’m mentioning FitBit here, because it gives you quick access to notifications and a heart rate monitor - the other features of the iWatch I don’t get).

              Apple should open up more, like Android?

              Sure - it’s the only way to save their software at this point (they gotta allow more ducttaping than they are). It used to be fine when their software was good, but it’s degraded in quality more recently (the fact that an iPhone 4 can’t run the latest iOS is atrocious. There is absolutely no reason for that kind of wastefulness in software.

              I had the Nexus 4 and the Nexus 5, they were garbage. My iPhone 6s+ is much better.

              Oh yeah. Android is mostly garbage. Out of the box it’s terrible. It’s only through customization that I made it work alright. I hate all “smart”-phone operating systems, but I especially hate the ones that don’t let me access a terminal. I can’t really argue that Android phones are better, but Apple phones are consistently getting worse. Their latest phone was a flop in sales for instance. I’m guessing that some other company is going to go in and shake it up with something weird, because people are starting to get sick of the “latest and greatest in smartphones”.

              You can only interact with a laggy UI for so many hours a day before you hit up the Apple Store.

              This is actually why I switched off of iOS. When it got too laggy on my iPhone 4, I gave up. Rather than upgrading, I switched to Android. Sure it’s not the greatest experience, but at least it’s not constantly getting worse. It’s remaining consistently… meh :P

              Windows 10 is pretty nice.

              No.


              I see no reason to justify this statement ;)

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                developer who uses multiple VMs at a time or works in Java

                That’s an good point (the Java one). Ever since I switched to using Mac desktops/laptops (2006?) I’ve found Java performance on OS X abysmal when compared to similarly specced systems running other OSes. Yet I see countless Java developers using Macs or developer tools written in Java.

                Why is Java performance so bad and remained bad? Even in the days when Apple released their own VM it was terrible.

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                  Do you have any empirical numbers? I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some hot path system call that isn’t optimized as well as on Linux. A lot of the focus in Darwin tends to focus on power management, single threaded / UI thread performance, and so on. That is, desktop tuned not server tuned. And Java isn’t exactly cautious with how it uses resources. I wonder what exactly it is. ?

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                    I don’t, I’m afraid. At the time I was trying to improve my Java experience on OS X I did some investigation, but never managed to get to the bottom of it.

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                  Are you talking about the new MacBook Pro? ‘cause a dual core processor and 8 GB ain’t gonna cut it

                  Ah, and there definitely isn’t quad 4 core 16 GB RAM model? That’s news to me. And my coworker who owns one, she’d be really surprised.

                  That combined with a wonky battery means an aesthetically pleasing design with no real power

                  The “wonky battery” is a software issue that was just fixed. Apple announced it was a software issue over a week ago.

                  You know there’s a problem when you can’t buy a new MacBook and a new iPhone without buying a dongle to make them compatible.

                  That’s fair, it’s pretty goofy.

                  but I remember every upgrade borking my ruby environment and screwing with my C libraries

                  That’s how upgrades work on Linux too. Either you haven’t noticed, have accepted it because Linux, or haven’t upgraded Ruby or C libraries since you switched to Linux 3 years ago.

                  I have a late 2013-ish iMac at home. […] Why are app start times so long? Why does it lag when I type text? Why can it only handle 4 tabs at a time in Chrome before becoming unresponsive, despite having 4 cores and 8 GB of RAM? Why is startup time so long? Why are the graphical glitches at the login screen?

                  No idea, my late 2013 Mac runs perfectly fine. I’ve found Macs have more longevity than any other computer, I guess our experiences differ.

                  BTW is it a feature that crap like this has to be written, because Apple declares that iTunes must open when an iPhone is plugged in. At least Linus is broken in ways that make sense.

                  This is a ridiculous imagined problem with a straightforward solution. What a joke.

                  Sure, but [brew]’s not an Apple product. Just because someone ducttaped on a nice solution doesn’t make the OS any better.

                  Literally the entirety of every single Linux OS distribution. I guess that doesn’t make any Linux OS at all any better? I agree, I actually think it’s a huge problem with Linux. Red Hat has made a good effort at a unified Linux distro, but I personally think they do a so-so job at best.

                  That’s a huge statement to make when there are hundreds of possible desktop environments out there.

                  Gnome 2, Gnome 3, KDE 3, KDE 4, LXDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, MATE, I tried them all. It’s a huge statement that none of them meet my standard of quality.

                  I generally go with a lightweight window manager and no compositing which makes everything run fast. The clarity of what’s running why is great too, and I can hack every part of my desktop I want to. It’s not for everyone, but it’s definitely less buggy than OS X and Windows.

                  I’m glad you enjoy your setup. I’ve been there, I’m over the novelty of computing like it’s the 90s.

                  X is crap, and it’s a pain in the neck to reconfigure your graphics drivers and everything, but it’s not that big a deal once it’s working (most of the time) ;)

                  Yeah, I’m over it.

                  However, BSD isn’t an Apple thing

                  No, but it’s built on FreeBSD.

                  Darwin is a bucket of garbage to configure from the CLI

                  What custom kernel configuration are you doing on a Mac?

                  I’d be impressed if anyone knew a bunch of launchctl commands off the top of their head.

                  brew services. Also launchctl isn’t Darwin. Darwin is a kernel, launchctl is an init system.

                  OSX guts are ugly, man

                  I’ve written about launchd and systemd before, and I personally disagree. I’d much rather have this than shell scripts. What a bunch of nonsense. It’s great that systemd is finally bringing such sophisticated features as dead process respawning and socket activation to the Linux core.

                  I’ve only had experience with the Visual C++ compiler/debugger, and I gotta say, it wasn’t that great imho. The debugger was OK (and saying it’s better than GDB is like saying a car is better than a bicycle - GDB isn’t exactly designed to be user friendly and it’s not - Linux could definitely use a better debugger). C++ compilers in general are crap, since C++ is crap, but Visual C++ is buggy (I mean, there’s a post on the front page about that right now), and has error messages that weren’t any better than gcc messages. Besides, windows internals are a horror show.

                  I’m going to assume that you haven’t done very much C++ development at all based on this paragraph, and move on.

                  Apple is going to be pressed hard to win with Apple Music. They got in on the streaming too late to compete effectively.

                  Unfortunately the numbers disagree with you. Which I think is unfortunate, as Spotify has done a great job. Music is a fast moving, deeply personal scene and Spotify has and continues to do a great job of keeping up with it. They are a company really all the way invested in Music and it shows in their product. But I use Apple Music because it’s so ridiculously low effort. I should support Spotify, but I’m too lazy. Probably a lot of other people are too.

                  Maybe I’ve been swayed by all the blog posts recently hating on the Watch. I don’t have any experience with smart watches, but I couldn’t figure out what the point of it was. What does it gain you that a FitBit doesn’t? (I’m mentioning FitBit here, because it gives you quick access to notifications and a heart rate monitor - the other features of the iWatch I don’t get).

                  I’ve written about this before on lobste.rs before, but the big one is phone use reduction. Triaging alerts with a glance is much nicer than getting my phone out of my pocket. And all my builds / tests / etc are integrated with pushover, so I get those notifications on my watch. At work I usually leave my phone on my desk while I walk around the office. And just checking the time / date. I guess in general it lets me be connected to my smartphone without having to pay attention to my smartphone all day when I have better things to do, like my job, or be with my friends.

                  This is actually why I switched off of iOS. When it got too laggy on my iPhone 4, I gave up.

                  Yeah, I don’t know what the deal is with that. I’ve heard a lot about it from people who’ve had a single smartphone for 2+ years. I’ve always been an upgrade every 2 years person, and I found that wasn’t enough on Android. My Nexus 5 got slower at a ridiculous rate to the point that it wasn’t meh, it was completely unusable from the perspective of anyone from the 21st century.

                  Windows 10 is pretty nice.

                  No.

                  I see no reason to justify this statement ;)

                  I see no reason for that attitude. ;P

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                Perhaps they’ll get a new CEO before then. Microsoft survived Ballmer.

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                  And post-Ballmer Microsoft is a strange beast indeed. A lot of their product teams still work the Ballmer way, and there’s still a huge bureaucratic overhead on those. But their devtools… it’s like an entirely different planet.

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                  I used to argue that a major selling point was device interoperability between the phone, the computer, the Airport, etc. but I also have the watch and the TV and it isn’t really all that, like the article mentions. The Apple TV in particular is neat, but not great; Apple Music doesn’t work all that reliably on it—I often stream from Youtube instead. I dunno. They just seem spread thin and treading water. The new Macbook Pro has that goofy touch bar on it that I really don’t desire, but other laptops just don’t seem as well-made to me. So they can probably coast for a while.

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                    I’m with you. I also invested > 4k$ in a new top of the line MBP and

                    • random crashes (better with last sierra update)
                    • touchbar rendering issues
                    • audio freeze so often that I’ve a script to reset it (better afer last sierra update)
                    • some of my keyboard keys work 4 out of 5 times.
                    • unimpressive battery life

                    overall I agree with the sentiment of the OP.

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                  After watching Steve Jobs’ last keynote, I was astonished at the contrast; Apple’s air of self-awareness seems to have been replaced with an increasingly self-congratulatory attitude. Jobs and Forstall openly acknowledged the shortcomings of MobileMe and iOS 4, while Apple pats themselves on the back at almost every turn now — including their increased number of press appearances. Apple must not fall head-over-heels in love with their own products, or pride themselves in their accomplishments, lest they become blind to their shortcomings.

                  When Steve Jobs acknowledged that MobileMe was bad on stage; people were absolutely floored. That is because Steve and Apple as a whole up until then almost never admitted that a product in the past was a bad decision let alone a product that they were currently supporting. This supposed piece of evidence is in fact an outlier that proves the rule.

                  Forstall was fired in part because of his stubbornness. It seems the major barrier between Apple accepting their future of devices (and their product teams) that work together and a new design philosophy was Forstall.

                  Apple now makes more appearances because they are involved in more public things. Tim Cook was thrust into the spotlight with the FBI case which amounted to a lot of appearances. Apple Music involves a lot of collaboration and radio interviews and other such things that necessitate public appearances.

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                    I got the watch, and was pretty excited about it, when it first came out. A few months ago I realized I really only used it to track calories when I work out, which I think it’s probably not good at, and as a timer. Oh, and I changed the color of the hands. The app story is pretty sad; I used Authy a few times, but it takes so long to hook up to the phone, it would be much quicker and easier to get the phone out.

                    I sort of stopped wearing it a few months ago. Not a conscious thing, I just don’t get much value out of it. I think I’d rather have a decent watch, but apparently I’d rather not have a watch at all. I guess I represented “blue ocean” for them… but I’m not going to make the mistake twice.

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                      I just don’t get the use cases for a smart-watch in the first place. You know what I don’t want? I don’t want notifications on yet another goddamn device. Biomonitoring is mildly interesting, but hardly something I’d use (my calorie counter is “am I hungry?” and my workout monitor is “do I feel like falling over and dying yet?”).

                      Like… what would one actually use a smartwatch for?

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                        I think a smart watch could be pretty neat when I’m skiing, no need to take my phone out and risk dropping it from the chairlift and I wouldnt need to take my gloves off at -30 celcius to check the time.

                        Though I’m highly sceptical of the batteries ability to survive -30 celcius

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                          If the watch is -30C, you’re suffering major frostbite. When it’s nestled up against your arm and partially covered by your gloves/coat, it should stay pretty warm.

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                            Oh I’m not saying the watch would be -30, but I’ve had cellphones and cameras go dead on me before even when snuggled in my coat.

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                        Another anecdota: My wife wears hers every day, and absolutely loves it.
                        On the few occasions when she accidentally leaves the house without it, she reports that not having it is inconvenient.

                        My guess is she appreciates the fact that notifications about messages, alarms, alerts, etc, appear on her wrist, without her having to get her phone out of her purse and look at it every couple of minutes.

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                          I don’t own an Apple Watch, but I’ve occasionally had the feeling that I would want such a thing for this reason: it sure would’ve been nice to get this half-second of information without pulling out my phone. Although admittedly, in probably 80% of these cases for me personally, the information in question is the time, a use-case for which I hear wrist-based technology has long been available.

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                            That makes sense. It’s inconvenient for my wife to fish her phone out too, and often if she does, she leaves it someplace else in the house. But she’ll never wear a watch. In my case, I have the phone in my pocket anyway. I’d think that the notifications would be less intrusive, but when I go into a meeting I have to fiddle with the watch more than the phone and I usually silence the phone anyway because I don’t trust the two devices to figure it out. Also, I have noticed that sometimes the connection between the watch and the phone goes out and my phone goes off anyway, so the reliability isn’t so high that I can take it for granted.

                            I had a Pebble a few years ago, and I liked that in the car I could glance at my wrist to see if a text was worth responding to. But I have a newer car now that reads texts to me aloud, so this use case left about as quickly as it came.

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                          The author wrote a whole article about Apple and didn’t use the words “computer”, “macbook” or “os x”.