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    Describing an electron app as “doesn’t suck” when there are multiple native macOS Markdown editors is a bit rich.

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      Being native isn’t everything. Btw you’re going to need a HTML renderer anyway if you want to render Markdown notes. Some native apps, like Evernote, use the available engine, at least on macOS, and they have to check if their notes render the same way across platforms, and for some reason they show you a spinner before rendering even simple notes. Notable ships the rendering engine with the app, but at least it doesn’t show you the spinner.

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        and they have to check if their notes render the same way across platforms,

        Doesn’t markdown typically render to all but the simplest of HTML elements? (e.g.,Lists, headers, paragraphs, links) I find it hard to believe that different platforms are going to render this dramatically different (aside from default fonts).

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          You can put arbitrary HTML inside Markdown. For the most part maybe the result will be the same, but different engines don’t always render out the same thing, so you have to check.

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            But do you regularly use random HTML in markdown when taking notes? I’ve never needed it. If so, what things are you using? And, how necessary is it? Does the amount of software complexity/bloat really create more value?

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              I sometimes use the <kbd> tag and the <p> tag for centering images but not much else. You could restrict your support to a narrower syntax, but then that stops being a Markdown renderer for me.

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                For me, Markdown’s “can copy over HTML” is a mistake. I much prefer it with extensions, to do tables and things. That’s my choice though. Thanks for clarifying your choices.

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              Does it matter if it renders out the same thing? Heck, even for actual websites some differences per target are expected (and at least by me, appreciated). Extreme example: lynx. Or user stylesheets or min font sizes, etc. One of the nice things about HTML is that it is somewhat flexible like that.

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                I guess it depends on the difference, as long as the note is rendered “ok” the differences may be acceptable.

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                You can put arbitrary HTML inside Markdown.

                Well, that depends on the markdown processor and output format, doesn’t it? If I use Pandoc to convert markdown to PDF via LaTeX, then I don’t expect to be able to put HTML in there.

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                  Of course it depends on your definition of “Markdown”.

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                    That then refutes this point:

                    Btw you’re going to need a HTML renderer anyway if you want to render Markdown notes.

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                      I think he meant that if you define Markdown as something different than the common and original definition (text → HTML processor), then yeah, you can’t put arbitrary HTML in a Markdown document.

                      But this project uses the normal definition of Markdown, which allows arbitrary HTML.

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          Why is this better or different than:

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            I’m not really familiar with either of those so it would be better for you to try Notable and see the differences for yourself, but from what I can see:

            • Both of them don’t use GitHub-flavored Markdown, which is one of the main features I want.
            • Org-mode to the best of my knowledge isn’t graphical, and although way more powerful than Notable I don’t need the extra things it provides. I have still access to global search & replace, git versioning and all that because all of Notable’s notes are also plain files.
            • TiddlyWiki looks very ugly to me, also I don’t want to use a WYSIWYG editor nor writing crap like this by hand (taken from its homepage):
            <div style="font-size:0.7em;text-align:center;margin-top:2em;margin-bottom:2em;">
            <<list-thumbnails filter:"[tag[HelloThumbnail]]" width:"168" height:"95">>
            </div>
            
            • It seems that TiddlyWiki is trying to solve a problem I don’t care about, from the homepage:

            The philosophy of tiddlers is that we maximise the possibilities for re-use by slicing information up into the smallest semantically meaningful units with rich modelling of relationships between them. Then we use aggregation and composition to weave the fragments together to present narrative stories.

            I don’t really understand what this means.

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              Tiddlywiki is about making a personal knowledge base, not a daily note taking tool.

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            Pretty neat! Code is well-organized too (directory hierarchy is a bit deep haha)!

            Could do a mobile version w/ React Native and share a good amount of the code potentially 🤔🤔. Another interesting thing would be having the codemirror elements be executable JS; to the point of rendering components that they are the source of. Or even making various notes modules each other can import. So it becomes a literate code note taking app 🤔🤔.

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              Yes mobile apps are definitely missing, there could be a good amount of code sharing between the platforms, ideally I’d like to have as close to a single codebase as possible.

              I’m not sure what you’re suggesting codemirror-wise, but feel free to open an issue about that on GitHub.

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              Notable isn’t cross-platform since it uses Electron, which doesn’t work on the BSDs.

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                Very nice! It reminds of The Hit List a bit, and I’ve been looking for a cross-platform open-format replacement for that! Are there any plans to add TODO/task -type features to it?

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                  There are currently a couple of shortcuts for creating/checking todos. I haven’t added anything yet todo-wise because it’s something I don’t really need, and I’m not sure how those features should look like. If you have any suggestions feel free to open a GitHub issue about that, maybe something more specifically todo-oriented could be implemented.

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                  I find it hard to take the whole genre of “yet another Markdown notes application” seriously until they catch up to the featureset of OneNote or org-mode. Very much dime a dozen.

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                    One essential feature to me for note taking are images (specifically screenshots). “Markdown” is a strong hint that it doesn’t handle images at all. OneNote does that quite well. It just lacks a good journalling function and needs to be cross-platform and Open Source.

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                      You can actually attach arbitrary files to notes in Notable, and even render attachments inline. I think it works fine but you need to somehow link the two.

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                    I’m working on a notes web app myself so it’s cool to see inspiration like this. I’m using Firebase as a backend instead of local filesystem to support cross-device usage as well as sharing/microblogging.

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                      Good luck with that :)