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    I like reading detailed reviews like this. It seems that GAE is another half-abandoned product with terrible support, like many other Google products.

    It’s like Google’s approach to products is to avoid talking to customers at all costs both before and after release, under no circumstances dedicate any resources to marketing, then get bored and move on when the product doesn’t take over the world immediately after release. It’s almost a caricature of engineers doing business, except in this case they somehow managed to snag enough revenue from ads to keep on doing this without going bust. It’s a pity because it wastes a lot of resources on the part of customers who get duped into using Google products, only to have a terrible experience.

    On the other hand, I did have a good experience with Google support once when working with Google Maps, but that was under the aegis of a giant corporate account that was probably costing some hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. So for giant corporations, Google products might be OK, and for everybody else AWS or Heroku or something else is likely a better choice. Or perhaps I’m overlooking all the great Google products?

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      It seems that GAE is another half-abandoned product with terrible support, like many other Google products.

      I wouldn’t jump to that conclusion off this single review, especially given GAE backs products like Pokemon Go, Khan Academy, and Spotify.

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        I guess this is in line with my suggestion that things can work well for large customers? Actually, large customers get better treatment everywhere, but it just seems far more extreme with Google.

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          and Spotify

          Do you have a reference for this? AFAIK, GAE does not back anything user-facing at Spotify.

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            No GAE, AFAIK, but plenty of GCP.

            (I worked there for 7 years and it’s public information.)

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              I stand corrected!