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        I am consistently impressed by sr.ht, and look forward to renewing.

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          I like SourceHut. Until I started seeing sourcehut.org instead of sr.ht, I thought the service was called “Sir Hat,” that I thought was some funny idiosyncratic programmer named thing.

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            At the open alpha release[0], sr.ht is

            pronounced “sir hat”, or any other way you want

            [0] https://drewdevault.com/2018/11/15/sr.ht-general-availability.html

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              Thanks for this post, so I’m not crazy. I have this funny experience where I swear I read something but can’t remember the source, specifically. I don’t bookmark it because it’s not significant to me at the time, but it’s in my memory (eg, first post of minecraft beta, satoshi’s bitcoin paper, etc).

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            And I’m so happy that Drew makes a point about mentioning the Mercurial support in webpage footers and other descriptions of sr.ht. We had a chat yesterday in IRC about possibly hosting some of the Mercurial project’s repos officially on sr.ht.

            I don’t know if anything will come of it (the heptapod group might be another option), but it would be good to have a new post-bitbucket home, and this seems like a fine place to move into.

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              Thank you!

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            https://gitea.io if self-hosting

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              These are only alternatives if you barely use any features of gitlab.

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                Fair enough. There are also non-git forges like fossil and pijul, which may be better solutions for some folks.

                But perhaps more to the point, the announcement says that self-hosting non-Enterprise GitLab users are unaffected by this new telemetry:

                For Self-managed users: GitLab Core will continue to be free software with no changes. If you want to install your own instance of GitLab without the proprietary software being introduced as a result of this change, GitLab Community Edition (CE) remains a great option.

                … and I suppose one could always fork GitLab Core. But if you don’t want to self-host, and you don’t want to pay for a service, you generally don’t have a lot of leverage over the business decisions made by those providing your free services.

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              FWIW — Pendo is a tool used by product teams to make better products. It’s not interested in tracking individuals or targeting you for advertising. The story here is really: the PMs at Gitlab are using this to figure out how to make the interface nicer on Gitlab.com

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                The same could be accomplished with surveys and A/B testing. You don’t need to inject more proprietary javascript and ship ‘telemetry’ to a 3rd party for that.

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                  Yes, you could build a competitive set of features as offered by a 350 person company staffed with statisticians and product management experts instead of working on your own thing.

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                  It’s not interested in tracking individuals or targeting you for advertising.

                  Pendo is a for-profit corporation and tracking users is one way to make money, so they clearly have an interest in that. Their code is closed source so I don’t know where you get this confidence.

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                  From https://about.gitlab.com/blog/2019/10/10/update-free-software-and-telemetry/

                  In order to service the needs of GitLab.com and GitLab Self-Managed users who do not want to be tracked, both GitLab.com and GitLab Self-Managed will honor the Do Not Track (DNT) mechanism in web browsers. This means that, if you turn on Do Not Track in your browser, GitLab will not load the JavaScript snippet. The only downside to this is that users may also not get the benefit of in-app messaging or guides that some third-party telemetry tools have that would require the JavaScript snippet. Overall, we believe these changes will continue to help us achieve results in improving our product experience for users, while also giving choice to users who only want free software. Please let us know your thoughts.

                  I’m not sure what GitHub’s tracking is like (for comparison) and whether they respect DNT but frankly this doesn’t sound to me like the outcry is justified. According to some guy from GitLab support that posted internal chatlogs on the Orange Website (with permission), you can also opt-out of that tracking entirely for an instance.

                  I’m not affiliated with GitLab other than liking the tool but I think we should all try to stay based on facts and less on FUD.

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                    Let’s just throw this on top of the ICE support news from a couple weeks ago. That’ll look good. If they have a PR team, they’re about to be busy again. :)

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                      VC money talk.

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                      Just as an FYI: the issue was using the wrong issue tracker, it has been moved to https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab/issues/34833.

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                        It’s a pleasant surprise that they didn’t add telemetry to the self hosted community free edition. Odd that the paid versions can’t remove it, but the community edition can. I guess they figured they would save people the effort of forking and creating a do not track distro.

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                          They are scared amazon will fork it =)

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                          Isn’t it sometime a good idea to measure which features users are using? Also can’t they figure out most of it anyway on the server side with the xhr requests? Unless they are planning to sell that data.

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                            Also can’t they figure out most of it anyway on the server side with the xhr requests? Unless they are planning to sell that data.

                            Right. My concern is that the VC money is drying up and the hip way to make quick cash on the internets these days is selling user data..

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                            Just closed my account for good measure. Hosting my own Git repositories with cgit.

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                              Wow, that’s a good example of some terrible communication skills: So many people thinking the non-community self-hosted edition includes this tracking stuff. Unless of course they got scared and decided to undo the tracking in self-hosted versions after the public outcry… Oh, and apparently they rolled this out way before sending the mail?

                              It’s good to see people reacting so strongly to this, as a signal against user tracking. But I wonder how big of an effect this will really have on their bottom line.