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    All of these issues and more are why I schedule things in UTC time and have all my computers run on UTC time. No one can get confused about what the actual time of something is.

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      I’m not sure Russia deserves to be on this list any more so than the United States, Mexico and Canada, which are all somehow absent. Sure, some remote regions in Russia did end up being held hostage due to the politics and the timezone cleanup from Moscow, but as far as Moscow Time is concerned (which affects most of the population of Russia), changes have been announced at least several months in advance, and, thankfully, now with the elimination of the yearly DST changes all together since 2011 (and across all of Russia), things should be rather calm and quiet, although, to be fair, the original lack of much thought of whether there is any difference between the permanent winter time or the permanent summer time could probably have been given more thought, indeed.


      I think what we really need in the world is the elimination of this stupid DST in the first place. Then instead of having to switch the clocks twice a year throughout most of the West (sans Russia, Belarus, Arizona, Hawaii, Saskatchewan), and experience the associated seasonal loss of productivity for a few weeks as a result, clocks could be set to a permanent offset from the GMT, and we basically wouldn’t so much as need any TZ files to start with.

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        I think what we really need in the world is the elimination of this stupid DST in the first place.

        I think it’s very easy to forget the human aspects in favour of technical simplicity: http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2013/03/in_defense_of_daylight_savings_time.html

        clocks could be set to a permanent offset from the GMT

        That feels very Anglocentric of you - given the ambiguities of “GMT”, UTC would seem a much better choice! ;)

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          I think it’s very easy to forget the human aspects in favour of technical simplicity: http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2013/03/in_defense_of_daylight_savings_time.html

          This argument doesn’t hold up. Just move the whole timezone forward one hour and abolish DST, you’ll still have all the advantages of DST in summer while in winter (most) people will go to work and back home in the dark anyway.

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            That’s actually what Russia did in 2011 – abolished the winter/summer time, and went into a permanent DST in March 2011. Then come November, people supposedly started hated going to school/work in complete darkness in most of Russia, only to be greeted with the same darkness when coming back home. Of course, the opposition and the foreign-sponsored media blamed everything on the ruling party. So, in October 2014, Russia once again changed all clocks in line with the DST in Europe, only now going into a permanent winter time. Pretty neat!

            BTW, reading http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylight_saving_time_in_the_United_States, quite a few states did actually want to go into a permanent DST, but, apparently, the U.S. federal law, Uniform Time Act, prohibits states from extending daylight savings time, although I’m not exactly sure why they can’t just move into a neighbouring timezone on the winter time (which supposedly requires only a DoT authorisation, if even that), instead of remaining on their original timezone yet with a permanent DST.

            For example, Nevada is now asking U.S. Congress to let it stay on permanent DST within its Pacific Time, which will result in Nevada having the exact same time as Arizona, only in Arizona the time is called Mountain Time (without DST). Why not just switch into Mountain Time, and abandon DST, just like Arizona did without needing any U.S. Congress approvals? After all, “Pacific” isn’t exactly what comes to mind when you’re thinking Nevada, now is it?

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            It’s not at all about just the technological simplicity – there have been studies that have shown that the incidence of health and safety related incidents increases dramatically around the time that the clocks shift (heart attacks, doctor visits, auto accidents). So, the “human aspects” by far exceed the technological ones.

            Of course, the real-estate brokers, as well as the golf and the brick-and-mortar retail industry, will always campaign against the abolishment of DST. I am not at all surprised that your article in defence of DST was authored by a real-estate broker in LA.

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          I have always been really confused as to why we have to change our clocks for daylight savings. Why don’t we start work at (say) 9 in the winter and 10 in the summer? Then everyone always knows what time it is. Or would this be more problematic in that businesses would have to have summer / winter opening hours etc?