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The Myrddin 0.3 Release is done. Thanks for everyone that helped!

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    Congrats! Sorry if this is dumb question, but how does the api documentation get updated/generated? I see a link for libflate, but not libmath.

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      Right now, it’s generally maintained by hand, with the repo living here and mirrored in github as usual. The html is generated using ussm. Markdown is generated with a fork of sundown, which I’ve taught how to format code with the magic to make it runnable.

      I’d like to look at automating/improving doc maintenance, but I haven’t had a chance to dig into it. One thing that I feel pretty strongly is that autogenerated docs from comments are often either poor quality because they lack tutorial sections and examples, or hinder readability through sheer verbosity, so I want something that can cross reference the code, but keep the explanations and examples separate.

      I should definitely have the libmath documentation up – I did write it after all. Will look into where it went when I get home. Fixed.

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      Myrddin looks awesome I suppose, but what’s the attraction for potential users/developers?

      I read the homepage, and it says:

      It aims for control and simplicity. It features strong type checking, generics, type inference, closures, and traits. It aims to fit into a similar niche as C, but with fewer bullets in your feet.

      That sounds great, but is followed by

      It does not focus on guaranteeing perfect safety

      So, how exactly does it prevent me from shooting myself in the foot? Please don’t think I’m being mean when I ask this, but why would I use this?

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        Myrddin looks awesome I suppose, but what’s the attraction for potential users/developers?

        If you need to ask, why say it looks awesome?

        So, how exactly does it prevent me from shooting myself in the foot?

        A type system that catches most issues, runtime checks that catch many of the remaining ones. There are still gaps that you can fall through, and escape hatches that prevent perfect guarantees, but the gun rarely points at your foot by default.

        “Fewer bullets in your feet” is not equivalent to “Rigorously proven to have zero bullets in your feet”

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          The description is very promising and the syntax is a nice derivative of C. With all the competition these days it’s difficult to distinguish the truly innovative and special from those who make empty promises. So it’s awesome… I suppose.

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        I love seeing a new language, espacially like this one which feels special for some reason, maintain active development.

        Maybe I will try it out oneday. Looks elegant.