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    Catalina runs best on Macs with hardware specifications that Apple marketing isn’t yet prepared to make the baseline for models such as the iMac.

    So MacOS Catalina is like Windows Vista?

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      Yes. Having been a Windows user at that time, all I feel are unpleasant flashbacks.

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        In that case, on the upside macOS in 2-3 years is going to be absolutely fantastic for 5-7 years!

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          You jest but I’m looking forward to it.

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            And then it will be cursed to become a user-hostile ad platform that you have to pay for, until the end of time.

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          Using any new piece of software triggers roughly two dozen security prompts, so yes.

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          To give a counterpoint to the other, negative, comments: I upgraded from High Sierra to 10.15.2 and I have had no problems thus far. The notarization requirement is somewhat annoying, but, ultimately, I appreciate that it exists and, personally, I like that I get to specifically give (or not) access to various parts of the filesystem per app.

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            Pretty much every release since Snow Leopard has (rightfully) received a fair amount of criticism. Things generally seem to get better at the end of the cycle after a few dot releases.

            If anything, this shows that Apple cannot handle the yearly release. I think many Mac users (me included) would be very grateful if they moved to a 2-3 year release cycle as before. That doesn’t mean that there can’t be new features in the meanwhile, but just ship them when they are ready.

            I understand that they want to show off features at some keynote every year. But this is killing macOS as a platform. Plus the keynotes are very crammed anyway, given the number of platforms that they have now (iOS, macOS, iPadOS, watchOS, tvOS).

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              People say “go back to 2 year release cycles” but continuous releases would probably be much more effective at shipping less buggy software.

              The idea of shipping a bazillion changes all together is anathema to modern software development, and making that window even longer isn’t going to make things nicer. I know why they do the yearly cycle (marketing pushes), but perhaps they should consider the damage it does to the brand to just have a broken OS all the time, and adopt strategies that make things up to date while not having a billion bugs`

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                People say “go back to 2 year release cycles” but continuous releases would probably be much more effective at shipping less buggy software.

                I don’t know, continuous releases make it harder to introduce large architectural changes and get them properly tested. Unless you introduce something similar to Windows fast and slow rings (and get enthusiasts to run them).

                but perhaps they should consider the damage it does to the brand to just have a broken OS all the time, and adopt strategies that make things up to date while not having a billion bugs`

                I fully agree! At this point it would even be better if they didn’t update macOS at all, besides reliability and security fixes, than the yearly mess that is dumped on users.

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                  I don’t know, continuous releases make it harder to introduce large architectural changes and get them properly tested.

                  My gut feeling is to just not do large architectural changes. Figure out how to make them small and incremental instead. Takes longer, except you’re not spending a bunch of time poking at a system randomly because it’s impossible to reason about the scope of change.

                  This is an easy position for me to take from where I am sitting, though. Sometimes bandaids have to be taken off. But…. I dunno, I feel like software engineers tend to generate a lot of unforced errors that end up turning into “needed rewrites of this component”.

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                Given (as this article points out) how many users can’t yet upgrade, maybe the pause year should be this year.

                But more likely Apple says, “you get two pause years [of updates], so suck it up.”

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                Given APFS’s issues with spinning disks, it does seem rather crummy that Apple still sells these as a configuration. It doesn’t look like there are many dials to twiddle to fix that from the OS side, either.

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                  Agreed, but they don’t seem to care about the experience. For years, they have been selling non-Retina MacBook Airs, even though they optimized the default font rendering for HiDPI, making fonts look atrocious on new MacBook Airs. They still sell MacBooks Air/Pro with 128GB SSDs, which are basically unusable given the current size of the OS and a minimal set of applications.

                  When I bought my first MacBook (2007) you could buy any ‘low-end’ model and the experience would still be awesome with the latest macOS. Now the Mac to be optimized for Apple’s margins and not the user experience. This is in stark contrast to the iPhone, where a 5 year old 6s still works great with the latest iOS, and every model that is still sold will have a butter-smooth experience.

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                  I have one machine running it, and I’ve been surprised by how many apps aren’t supported on Catalina. I have a ScanSnap S1300, the support apps for it don’t run on Catalina and Fujitsu isn’t updating them. I had a Drobo FS unit, and its software doesn’t run on Catalina. Meanwhile I have a perfectly good 2011 iMac that can’t run 10.14 or 10.15 thanks to Apple’s eff you at users with their “sorry, we won’t let you install our OS on your old hardware, we’re done issuing updates, and I guess you better just throw it in the trash.”

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                    As long as you bought a new device, it looks like Apple’s approach worked.

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                      I didn’t, exactly. I picked up a 2015 MBP from a cow-orker. I slapped a 1TB SSD in it when I bought it and then went ahead and went straight to Catalina. And at this point, the odds of me buying a new Mac or even a refurb or second-hand Mac are pretty slim.

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                      A 2011 iMac is almost ten years old. Apple can’t support legacy hardware forever. Even MS gives about six years for their mainstream server OS support. If Apple offered an extended release type offering outside of their Alliance stuff, I suspect most users wouldn’t want to pay for it.

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                      I’m sticking with Mojave for now purely because of Lightroom. I’ve got one of the last standalone (non-CC) versions. AFAICT they don’t do standalone anymore so I can’t upgrade - CC isn’t worth the monthly fee as I use it so infrequently.

                      Until I can find something to replace LR (and it was a huge pain to migrate from Aperture way back when), I’m kinda stuck.

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                        Many of programs that were upgraded to be 64 bit compatible are now buggy. This makes Catalina feel more unstable.

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                          When I first upgraded, I was experiencing painful bursts of static on Bluetooth devices during periods of silence (generally inbetween music tracks).

                          That’s been fixed in 10.15.3, so it’s at least no longer physically painful to upgrade to Catalina :)

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                            Argh: an update on the above. It hasn’t been fixed, but the problem happens less frequently.

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                            I upgraded on the day it was released and the only actual problem I’ve had is that some 32 bit games don’t start. But I’m an ex-Linux user so my tolerance for small problems is perhaps slightly elevated due to practice :)

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                              Bummer. I’m waiting for delivery of a new 16” MBP, and while I’m excited about getting the hardware, being forced into Catalina does not fill me with joy.

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                                Don’t worry, Catalina is fine. People get … enthusiastic whenever there’s anything negative about Apple.

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                                  Catalina is pretty damn far away from being fine. Your experience might differ of course, but that doesn’t mean much — there’s a multitude of different use cases out there. Just read the article.

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                                  I would downgrade to Mojave as soon as I get it.

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                                    I don’t think it’s possible to downgrade to a version of macOS before the version your machine came with?

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                                      Of course it’s possible, I do it literally all the time at work. Every new Mac we buy goes straight back to Mojave. You just need to create a bootable USB stick, erase the drive and reinstall the OS.

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                                  10.15.2 seems decent. I still see some occasional beachballs with Touchbar integration on Preview and QuickTime, but that’s about it.

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                                    I wonder what’s happening in Apple’s QA and testing process. Though perfect testing is difficult, I think Apple has enough resources to do this better. They don’t have to make such trade-offs between quality and cost like start-ups.

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                                      I don’t know, some of the bugs I’ve seen with their windowing features make wonder what their QA goals are.

                                      Screen time on macOS is a neat try at useful software but it’s barely more stable than an alpha… and even after several release of macOS versions, full screen / split screen is still buggy. Combine the Full Screen with Screen Time at your own risk.

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                                      Apple should make software improvements that will keep Mac from overheating first tbh

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                                        It’s worth reporting bugs to Apple’s Feedback Assistant (even if the complaints do fall on deaf ears).

                                        I found an interesting project where you can share reports so other people can test/report too if it affects them.