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    My favorite abuse of prime numbers is to solve interview questions that ask you to detect whether two strings are palindromes: Assign a prime to each letter of the alphabet the strings are made out of and multiply. If the numbers you get are the same, the strings are palindromes.

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      Do you mean anagrams? :p

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        Oh I do! orz

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      If numeric type in PostgreSQL can go up to 16383 digits after the decimal point, how many comments can I store this way?

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        If we’re taking Postgres, might as well have parents INTEGER[] and save yourself a lot of messing about.

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          Or just use a recursive CTE

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        Interesting approach, but I’m curious about in which ways this is better than a prefix tree?

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          This is just a fun approach. As another comment mentions, use INTEGER[]. Having to do factorization for every comment whose parents you want to display is perhaps not expensive, but definitely not free.

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            Recursive CTE is the solution in this case. Solves both “would need N joins” and “can’t count(*) comfortably”.

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            I don’t think it is better than a prefix tree. Using prime numbers is kind of funny and original, but I’ve never used this approach in a real product and I normally wouldn’t!

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              Ah, okay. Sorry for being confused :o