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      It’s quite a pity almost all software these days doesn’t use the fork/exec model anymore. People abandoned it “for performance issues”, but I’m sure that today it’s fast enough for 99.9% of use cases (and when it’s not fast enough, it would only be an incentive to make it faster).

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        Sounds like it’s getting back to DJB’s approach (see 4.4) but with randomization on top:

        https://cr.yp.to/qmail/qmailsec-20071101.pdf

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        I really like these kind of writeups, both tedu’s but also the post mentioned from poolp.org. I do think it’s an unfortunate trend that all these lovely things are buried away from openbsd.org or undeadly. Maybe the world needs a ‘Planet OpenBSD’ where all the developer’s blogs are syndicated?

        planet.openbsd.org doesn’t appear to currently be a thing.

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            Argh, no full text RSS feed. Why do people persist in doing that (and making me jump through [minor] hoops to work around it)?

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              In my case, because it would push tons of unnecessary traffic.

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                I’d rather your feed had a single but fulltext entry than 10 but abbreviated ones. (At least as long as you don’t post twice within half a day or so… which I don’t remember seeing.)

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                  Do you happen to know which readers replace content when it changes? That was my other concern, that i update something, but readers cache a frozen version.

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                    Don’t all of them? I can’t remember seeing one that doesn’t. No doubt they do exist, but I doubt they are at all common. I can remember ones all the way out at the opposite extreme, where they version they content and offer diffs in the UI. NewsBlur has that in some capacity, and there was a desktop one on the Mac that did this – probably old NetNewsWire.

                    Frozen caches really happen when items get updates after falling off the bottom of the feed. Obviously aggregators won’t see content you didn’t put in the feed… so item inclusion for the feed must be based on update date rather than creation date, if that’s a concern.

                    (Btw, while we’re here… could you use proper <category>s in the item, instead of putting a line with <p>tagged: at the bottom of your description and then me having to sed your feed to fix that?)

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                      Oh? category is a thing? that seems doable. the perils of writing everything from scratch.

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                        Yup. I recommend http://www.rssboard.org/rss-profile for reference, which is lamentably difficult to stumble upon serendipitously. It includes recommendations based on surveys of publishers and aggregators in the wild… well, from 10 years ago, but still.

                        Hm, if that peril is also the reason you don’t have a <guid>… that would be nice, because in absence of it, aggregators must guess how to identify an item as being the same one throughout edits. For flak you can just switch the <link> to <guid> I think (you never change those URLs, right?)… or have both if you worry about edge-case aggregators. For inks, I’ve noticed you number the blocks in the HTML, so you already have an identifier to reuse – keep the <link> and add a <guid isPermaLink="false">, probably with a tag: URL, maybe tag:www.tedunangst.com,2016:inks:37 (where only the trailing number varies; the date is just any point in time you controlled the domain, it can be constant). That would go a long way to ensuring that your updates to items do come through as updates, rather than showing up as dupes. (That’s part of the reason I sed your feed – I’d get dupes all the time when you edited your inks tags, which you do quite a bit, whereas metadata doesn’t figure into the deduping in Liferea, so now I only get dupes anymore when you actually update the item description.)

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                          Ah, cool. My understanding of RSS readers is heavily influenced by the one I wrote, which is also odd in its own way.

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                            Hey, thanks for all the fixes! Much appreciated.

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          Question for those of us running openbsd, what you’re primary reason for picking openbsd?

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            For me:

            • Focus on quality (and security as a byproduct of that).
            • Sane out of the box defaults.
            • Continual improvement - that’s one of the reasons I’ve reduced my use of NetBSD over the past few years as their development has slowed and releases have become less and less frequent (aside: that makes me rather sad as I’ve always been a big fan of NetBSD and love pkgsrc).
            • Regular release schedule.

            And all the obvious things like being the home of pf, CARP, OpenSSH, LibreSSL, OpenNTPD, OpenBGPD, etc.