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    If you’re going to go into Dev mode, is there a reason not to use something like Crouton? It seems pretty nice to me, and I have a few different environments on my little Chromebook…

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      Just that it’s a bunch of baggage. Why install Linux if you don’t need to?

      I did actually have Crouton installed until I powerwashed yesterday (had a weird issue with downloads vanishing). I like to keep things minimalistic - easier to get things back to how they are if anything goes wrong (and, less to go wrong!).

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        I like to keep things minimal and clean, so the ability to nuke chroots when they get hairy is pretty nice to me. I wouldn’t want to be experimenting with Go, and mess it up (say if I’m mucking about with the core), and then have to start all over in my native environment… crouton seems to make it easier to “get back to things […] if anything goes wrong”, at least in my mind.

        I would say I do the same for work tho: I have a per-client per-assessment VM/hyve, and I nuke them when done (makes data clean up easy as pie), so it may just be an extension of that.

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          Yeah, I can totally understand all that (I liked using Crouton for testing stuff out), but for some stuff (eg. if it’s just downloading an archive with an executable binary like this one) it seems like overkill.

          I’m not against it, there just needs to be enough of a benefit to justify the (albeit rather small) overhead.

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            I think that’s pretty fair; it’s actually spurred me to try a native, non-chrooted Go on my chromebook sometime this week (I’m working on some static analysis tools for it anyway, so it’s a good place to try). Definitely not my normal route, but why not try it?

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      without installing Linux

      You’re already running Linux. ChromeOS is just a Linux distro with a patched kernel (like most Linux distros nowadays).

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        You’re already running Linux

        It’s probably obvious I know this given in the post we use Bash, download the Linux version of Go and execute a bunch of Linux/Bash commands ;)

        ChromeOS is just a Linux distro

        There’s a huge difference between using ChromeOS as-is and installing a Linux distro a Chromebook. It might not be obvious to anyone that doesn’t use a Chromebook in dev mode, but it’s incredibly limited. Most people using Chromebooks in dev mode install some sort of Linux (doing so via Crouton seems very popular). There’s no package manager and most of the stuff you’d expect to be there is missing (eg. the Rust setup script fails because file is missing and setting it up manually fails due to no C compiler, which so far I’ve not managed to satisfy). Nobody builds binaries for ChromeOS Linux.

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          Let’s get our definitions straight. A Linux distribution is a software distribution around a Linux kernel. No package manager required to qualify. No minimum userland requirements either.

          Nobody builds binaries for ChromeOS Linux.

          https://skycocker.github.io/chromebrew/

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            I never said ChromeOS was not Linux. My article says “without installing Linux”. “Having a Chromebook” does not mean you have “installed Linux”.

            The other stuff I added was just FYI about why making something work in dev-mode without installing Linux is actually interesting and is not just the same as making something work in Linux.

            By “nobody builds binaries for” I meant “people that build software don’t build binaries for” not that third parties don’t do it. I trust a binary I download from rustlang.org (who are building binaries used by many thousands of people) much more than a third party making binaries that are used by a handful.