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    6 finger mouse gestures. The horror!

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        This reminds me of this keyboard I had for a while: http://www.ergocanada.com/products/keyboards/fingerworks_lp.html

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            It was really good at detecting palm touches. I basically never had a problem with either unintentional keystrokes or mouse movements.

            It even autocorrected spelling errors on the keyboard! If your fingers drifted you could watch as you typed nonsense, then the keyboard would send a bunch of backspaces and fix it for you.

            In the end the main problem was that I was a student, I liked to work from coffee shops, and it was a pain to carry it around everywhere. And it was only fast to type on it after you got used to it. If you used it occasionally, you’d never stay fast.

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            That company got acquired by Apple nearly a decade ago. Sometimes wonder if haptic vibrations / materials will evolve to point where a hybrid keyboard/touchpad will make sense for mainstream users.

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              I remember when they were acquired! I’d been using the thing for about six months, then as I remember it, their web site was quietly replaced by a wiki or forum or something that just had the latest drop of their configuration utility and that was it. I didn’t find out what’d happened for over a year. One of their products was a drop-in replacement for the Powerbook G3 or G4’s stock keyboard, so of course once I knew it was Apple I figured they’d be coming out with built-in multitouch powerbook keyboards. I was routinely disappointed at keynotes for a couple more years. I didn’t foresee the iPhone…

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            In which case, is there anything wrong with a tiling window manager made for bloggers? I haven’t found a single tiling WM built for normal users, though correct me if I am wrong since I would be interested in seeing one.

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                I think the normal user could probably benefit from this style of tiling wm as opposed to something like awesomewm.

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            How well will this work when you have thousands of files and other things, do you just remember thousand different tags? Doesn’t seem as easy as just remembering a simple hierarchy.

            The benefit of hierarchy is discoverability. It shold be feasible to improve tag discoverability with autocomplete, natural language word associations, and tag relations. The author doesn’t really go into that, though.

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                Well, any wholesale storage management move would be a pain. For example, ripping all of your CDs to mp3 (or ogg vorbis, or FLAC) is a pain, but you do it if it’s worthwhlie to do so. What makes it worthwhile may vary: the UX benefits, interconnecivity benefits (e.g. everyone else is using it), specific technical platform benefits, etc.

                In other words, yes, changing your desktop metaphor may also require changing your files/folders metaphor.

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                    Such filesystem capabilities are already out there. BeFS and OpenBFS, for example, have the ability to add extended, indexed metadata to files, and to query the entire filesystem against that metadata. It’s very pleasant to work with.

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                  Make a list of the full paths of all files. Take each folder name and treat them as tags. Research has shown that for most people, moving the path ordering doesn’t disambiguate any files.

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                    What about calling all interior nodes in the tree tags, and applying all tags from the root to the leaf, plus the filename itself, to each of the leaf nodes (files) and calling that a starting point?

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                  Now this looks nice. It’s like dmenu and ranger combined, I can see that working pretty nicely.

                  I have found rofi to be fairly nice (there is a file browser in the examples).

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                    panels

                    How are these any better than the tiling window managers that already exist? What if someone want’s to see 10 things at once?

                    The big problem for most tiling WMs is that they are designed for Unix greybeards with no sense of UX. i3 is the only one I can recommend to anyone interested in them due to sane defaults and intuitive operation, and even then it’s a UI clusterfuck coming from typical overlapping window desktops - not because it’s tiling, but because of the way you operate it.

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                      Unix greybeards with no sense of UX

                      This is both unwarranted and wrong. First off, my beard’s not grey; and secondly, the UX of most tiling window managers are extremely well-designed. They’re designed for power and efficiency, at the expense of a shallow learning curve and discoverability without reading documentation. This is a perfectly legitimate tradeoff, and one that generally results in a better UX for the target audience.

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                        I’m not sure the knock against graybeard UX is warranted. Or at least, tiling managers like dwm are very well suited to my process of a few shell terminals and make and all that. I didn’t invent the makefile build system I use, it’s how I found things. A tiling WM is perfectly adapted for this.

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                            One is that they collapse into a very thin column that can also display information.

                            I think some more horizontal panes would be nice, but it’s hard to do so considering ease of use.

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                                Not really - what this does is collapse into a titlebar (on a tiling WM you’d be making a very thin window, god help you for that layout) and that titlebar can display notifications.

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                                    Except current WMs have no provisioning for this, and I presume the app ecosystem for this will make applications support it.

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                        Neo is a conceptual desktop operating system interface that is built for todays people, needs and technologies. Visualized below are ideas that were designed to inspire and provoke discussions about the future of productive computing. I have no intention of taking this beyond the concept stage. However, I am putting my work out there hoping that people build upon it.

                        Just thought I would put this quote here in case anyone else is looking for a download button (I only just realized it’s a proof-of-concept). I wonder how hard it would be to get some of these concepts working in Linux.

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                          Thanks. All I got to see was a picture of an iMac. None of the text loaded. I saw there was a lively discussion though, so i was curious if I should be interested.

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                            Could you please sort out the tags? show is–as I understand it–a tag meant for content directly created by Lobsters users.

                            Not just “Oh cool I think I should spam the front page with this nifty thing I found”.

                            EDIT: I suggested the design and philosophy tags.

                            Damned article looked more like an ad for something than an idea exploration anyways. Grump grump grump.

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                            Hrm… I’ve never been a fan of the “hidden” non-intuitive swipe patterns. They’re hard to do sometimes and can be hard to remember. Some may argue that hotkeys are the same way but they won’t be required for most actions by average users, and can be easier to remember. Also, you can scope hotkeys. I’m working on Linux with herbstluftwm, and have vim-like keybindings for tiling window management (i.e. meta-j -> select down, meta-s ->split, but my regular ctrl-j, ctrl-s bindings still work in vim), so it takes very little learning to get used to them.

                            Along with that, hiding menus off screen means users may not know. You have to know that a hidden menu is there to use it, which is part of the same issue that the swipe patterns have - there’s a learning curve.

                            The idea of putting more emphasis on voice control is definitely interesting. Not that I’d want it constantly recording and sending data to whomever it would be sent to, but if it was running locally, that could be pretty neat. If there’s less of a “mobile-ish” emphasis, I could see this becoming pretty useful (tiling window managers are definitely superior to floating), and making some of these features more mainstream could mean developers start writing better applications for tiling wms (i.e. different popup handling schemes, programs that didn’t honor resizing will begin doing so, etc).

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                              I like tiling WMs, and making them easy as possible UX wise is good. However, I am unsold on gestures. They require many fingers and a trackpad, are not intuitive, harder to program, and disrupt tasks like typing. Nor do I think voice commands or eye tracking will be accurate or useful.

                              There’s a lot to be done for menus, app or system - searchability, automatic personalization (learn from the mistakes of Office XP - you need to make it good) and quickness. I’m concerned about scability, particularly for app menus - they smell like overgrown hamburgers.

                              Filesystems are things I’ve thought about, though I’ve never been big on search. Tags done well could be superior to hierarchy though. Queries are nice, and remind me a lot of BeOS.

                              A problem with this is integrating with services. No one will take apps for this brave new world seriously unless it integrates into their ecosystems already, the ones providing their data - almost no one nowadays will use a music app without Spotify, for instance.

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                                I find it annoying that three of the four subsections titled “What’s wrong with {windows, the desktop, folders, the mouse}?” don’t actually answer that question. Those sections just claim that the old technology was made long ago in less complex times, and therefore it is inefficient – which is not necessarily a valid conclusion. He could have given some details in those paragraphs to help people see the flaws in their current tools, but instead he hid all his concrete arguments behind links to separate blog posts.

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                                  Interesting. I like the idea of a “better” interface as I agree that neither the windows-scattered everywhere nor the single app per screen is good for how I work. I use Moom, Witch, and Totalspaces along with Quicksilver (QS.app) for what is largely the “anti” Mac interface. These are mostly habits I picked up on Linux using Ion3, etc. for tiling.

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                                    I hate to face the fact that many people don’t even understand folders and this desktop concept seems to cater primarily to these people. Much effort went into this visibly but I’m not convinced.

                                    The window management idea though I like. More than current tiling windows managers anyway. I came up with something similar independently, though vertically and for windows that have their most relevant content at the bottom such as terminals or chat windows (They can be compressed leaving only the lower part)

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                                      So this is basically a tiling window manager with tags?

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                                        I would say it’s a tiling window manager concept for the masses.

                                        EDIT

                                        Also, there is a strong focus on touchscreen support, which I have not seen in other tiling WM’s.

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                                        Why is this labeled ‘mac’ ?

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                                          I would assume that comes from its reliance on a touchpad and all the images being of a mac